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IMAGE STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024826D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 141K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

For input, a user may wish to index a document on an individual user basis and enter into a file on a random basis. For output, the user may wish to retrieve any document or series of documents on an individual user basis. Indexing, however, would be only used in those specialized situations where a user wants a specific item. In most cases, the user is searching and wants all items related to a particular subject which will allow him options which permit the exercise of a human decision. As a result, the need for an indexing structure covering every possible combination is eliminated.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

IMAGE STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL Proposed Esli T. Marsh Classification

U.S. C1. 360/18 Int. C1. Gllb 5/02

Information Retrieval (I.R.) Considerations:

For input, a user may wish to index a document on an individual user basis and enter into a file on a random basis. For output, the user may wish to retrieve any document or series of documents on an individual user basis. Indexing, however, would be only used in those specialized situations where a user wants a specific item. In most cases, the user is searching and wants all items related to a particular subject which will allow him options which permit the exercise of a human decision. As a result, the need for an indexing structure covering every possible combination is eliminated.

The File:

Let one assume that a tape file capable of being passed quickly past a read/write head and also capable of being erased is provided. The user may want to add or delete items, test every item, index, print every item or only those items requested, or identify those items requested as being requested.

File organization:

Each document in the file is preceded by an index. An item would be all those documents following a given index. Documents of course may appear more than once under different indices creating a cross reference. Documents may also be a book or series of related pages.

Hardware:

The I.R. hardware would include a scanner for scanning the tape files, a printer to provide hard copies of the files requested, and an operating or programming console for the user or operator. The latter would include a suitable keyboard to permit the user to enter parameters into the search routine, a working memory, logic circuits, a preprogrammed search routine, and a tape unit. An optional control console might be designed to allow the user to program his own routines. Where tape time is less than print time, arrangements may be made to allow data to be keyed in during rewinding of the tape while the printer, which would be buffered, is working.

The Index:

For simplicity, it is assumed that numerics are being used, although alpha numerics

Volume 7 Number 2 March/April 1982 121

I I I I I I

I I

I I I

I I I I I I I

I I I

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IMAGE STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL (Cont'd)

could also be used. The index may simply comprise a number of any length and may include blanks or spaces. The index heads the item being stored and is entered on the tape immediately preceding the item. This allows a controlled tape advance. To facilitate locating of the item being stored, a cutting mark could be automatically entered on the tape following each item. On printing, the index number might be placed at the bottom of each page printed by the cutting mark, etc.

For example, to file Sales Bulletins one might construct a table as follows:

Product Subject

I....