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INEXPENSIVE FEATURE FOR KEYBOARD STRUCTURE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024869D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A keyboard comprises a substrate upon which the individual key contacts and associated interconnection circuitry may be formed using printed circuit tech-niques. The keytop array comprising the individual keytops and electrically conductive bridging contacts may then be assembled to the printed circuit substrate. The depression of a keytop brings the selected bridging contact into electrical engagement with one or more conductive key contacts to close the selected circuit.

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(EROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

INEXPENSIVE FEATURE FC Proposed KEYBOARD 1R STRUCTURE US: C1. 200/5A Classification Anon ymous Int. C1. HOlh 9/26

A keyboard comprises a substrate upon which the individual key contacts and associated interconnection circuitry may be formed using printed circuit tech- niques. The keytop array comprising the individual keytops and electrically conductive bridging contacts may then be assembled to the printed circuit substrate. The depression of a keytop brings the selected bridging contact into electrical engagement with one or more conductive key contacts to close the selected circuit.

In the design of the keyboard substrate, the printed circuitry may be formed on one side of the substrate while the key contacts are provided on the other side of the substrate. The individual key contacts extend through the substrate and each make electrical contact with appropriate printed circuit lines.

For the purpose of reducing the expense of the keyboard, the key contacts may comprise metal staples that are inserted directly into the board using a staple gun. The legs of staples are then firmly connected to the appropriate printed circuit lines on the other side of the board by passing the board through a solder bath.

The use of metal staples as key contacts eliminates the expenses of fabricating the substrate to have prepositioned drilled holes which then must be plated using conventional circuit board technology.

Volume 7 Number 4 July/August 1982...