Browse Prior Art Database

TACTILE ENHANCEMENT FOR CAPACITIVE KEYBOARD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024871D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Among the inexpensive keyboards today are touch sensitive capacitively coupled keyboards. The key is activated by the change of electrical capacitance due to finger placement on the key. These types of keys have not gained wide acceptance because the keys are easily, accidentally triggered. Also, there is no firm feedback either mechanically due to sense of touch or audability; thereby informing a user that the key has been, in fact, actuated. This is referred to as tactile feedback.

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KEROX DIĀ§CLOSURE JOURNAL

TACTILE ENHANCEMENT FOR CAPACITIVE KEYBOARD U.S. C1. 200/5A Ted Kaehler

Proposed Classification

Int. Cl. HOlh 9/26

CAPACl TI VE SURFACE

KEY BOARD

Among the inexpensive keyboards today are touch sensitive capacitively coupled keyboards. The key is activated by the change of electrical capacitance due to finger placement on the key. These types of keys have not gained wide acceptance because the keys are easily, accidentally triggered. Also, there is no firm feedback either mechanically due to sense of touch or audability; thereby informing a user that the key has been, in fact, actuated. This is referred to as tactile feedback.

The figure shows a cross section of a keytop 10 that will overcome this problem. Keytop 10 is integral with an entire keyboard molded from a single sheet of plastic material such as 10 mil polyvinylchloride. The plastic keytop is of sufficient strength to support a person's finger one quarter or one eighth of an inch above the surface of the capacitive keyboard. When keytop 10 is pressed by finger pressure 11, the keytop deforms, particularly at accordian-like regions 12, to permit the finger to capacitively couple with the surface 14 of the keyboard. The accordian- like regions 12 provide sufficient rigidity or snap action for tactile feedback to the user. Audio feedback may be also included.

Volume 7 Number 4 July/August 1982 225

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July/August 4 Nu...