Browse Prior Art Database

BRUSH PAPER-STRIPPER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024874D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 133K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A method and apparatus for separating copy paper from heated fuser rolls or similar structures by rotating brushes. Figure 1 is a sectional view of a typical roll fuser stripping mechanism employed on a heated roll.

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CEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

BRUSH PAPER-STRIPPER Proposed Klaus K. Stange Classification

U.S. CL. 271/174 Int. C1. B65h 29/54

FIG I

Volume 7 Number 4 July/August 1982 23 1

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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BRUSH PAPER-STRIPPER (Cont'd)

A method and apparatus for separating copy paper from heated fuser rolls or similar structures by rotating brushes.

Figure 1 is a sectional view of a typical roll fuser stripping mechanism employed on a heated roll.

Figure 2 is a sectional view of a fuser in which both rolls are heated and in which conventional stripper fingers are used on both rolls.

Figure 3 is a sectional view of a fuser with two heated rolls plus a proposed I'Brush Paper-Stripper Apparatustt.

Some xerographic copier systems use roll fusers (Figure 1) for fusing toner images to the copy paper. Such systems typically include one heatable roll 1 and one pressure roll 3 creating a long nip through which the paper 5, having an unfused toner image is passed. In most cases roll 1 is heated by an internal heating element
2. Such fusers require stripping fingers 6 to separate copy paper 5 from heated roll
1. In fusers in which the pressure roll 3 is severely deformed, copy paper "self- strips)! from the short radius of bulge 4 formed at the exit of the nip. Such fusers were designed for copy sheets having a toner image on one side. For duplex copying, the copy sheet is passed through the fuser a second time. In such conventional roll fusers depicted in Figure 1, the stripping fingers have been a source of problems, creating unreliable operation.

Some newer xerographic copier systems are capable of producing duplex copies, having unfused toner images on both sides of the copy sheet before fusing of the images to the sheet. Such systems are called "immediate duplex" or "single pass duplextt.

For such systems the roll fusers are modified (Figure 2) to heat both rolls 1, and the copy paper 5 passes through them only once. In such a fuser, the copy paper 5 will stick to either roll, and stripping fingers 6 will be needed for both rolls. Therefore, the previously mentioned stripper finger reliability problems will increase.

Referring t...