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UNITARY MOTOR - POLYGON SCANNER ASSEMBLY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024879D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A unitary motor-polygon scanner assembly consists of an electric motor with mirror facets an integral part of its rotating component. The rotor and mirror facets are cast and/or machined as a single unit. Other possible methods of integration would include bonding facets to the rotor. A polygon surface thus becomes an integral part of the motor as opposed to present concepts of separately fabricating and assembling an electric motor and polygon. The unitary design is applicable to both gyro-type inside-out motors (rotor external to stator) or conventional electric motors (rotor internal to stator). Typical designs are shown in Figures A and B, respectively.

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KEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

UNITARY MOTOR - POLYGON SCANNER ASSEMBLY William D. Moudy

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 350/6.7
Int. C1. G02b 27/17

I

-. SURFACE MOUNTING PROR W"DOW

HOUSING

--M- STATOR 'MIRROR FACETS

f/G 2

Volume 7 Number 4 July/August 1982 243

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UNITARY MOTOR - POLYGON SCANNER ASSEMBLY (Cont'd)

A unitary motor-polygon scanner assembly consists of an electric motor with mirror facets an integral part of its rotating component. The rotor and mirror facets are cast and/or machined as a single unit. Other possible methods of integration would include bonding facets to the rotor. A polygon surface thus becomes an integral part of the motor as opposed to present concepts of separately fabricating and assembling an electric motor and polygon. The unitary design is applicable to both gyro-type inside-out motors (rotor external to stator) or conventional electric motors (rotor internal to stator). Typical designs are shown in Figures A and B, respectively.

The concept described above provides potentially significant savings in material, assembly, alignment and balancing costs. The gyro-type motor is especially suited to this application because of its inherent speed stability provided by the high angular momentum of the rotor.

244

  XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 7 Number 4 July/August 1982

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