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PREPARATION OF TRANSPARENT, CONDUCTING CADMIUM SULPHIDE FILMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024902D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Highly transparent and conducting films of cadmium sulphide for use as a conducting barrier electrode in solar cells are produced by slowly heating cadmium sulphide powder to 800°C to commence evaporation of the powder. The evapor-ate$ cadmium sulphide is deposited on a Corning 7059 glass substrate heated to 200 C to form a film having a nominal thickness of 3000 angstrom. Indium isthen evaporated onto the cadmium sulphide film while the substrate is held at 200 C to form an indium film having a thickness of about 200 angstrom. Both films are deposited in succession without breaking the vacuum. Heating the coated glass substrate at 5OO0C for one hour increases optical transmittance properties and markedly reduces the resistivity. More specifically, a glass substrate coated with a 3000 angstrom cadmium sulphide f'fm exhibits an 80 percent transmission at 600 nm and a sheet resistivity of 5 x 10 ohm-cm. Glass coated with a 3000 angstrom layer of cadmiu? sulphide and 200 angstrom layer of indium exhibits after heat treatment at 500 C for one hour, an 83 percent transmission at 600 nm and a sheet resistivity of 0.05 ohm-cm. This technique also permits the use of very thin films of cadmium sulphide instead of thicker (10 to 20 microns) films currently used in the fabrication of solar cells.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PREPARATION OF TRANSPARENT, CONDUCTING CADMIUM SULPHIDE FILMS

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 136/243 . Int. C1. F161 3/00
D. Krish Murti

Highly transparent and conducting films of cadmium sulphide for use as a conducting barrier electrode in solar cells are produced by slowly heating cadmium sulphide powder to 800°C to commence evaporation of the powder. The evapor- ate$ cadmium sulphide is deposited on a Corning 7059 glass substrate heated to 200 C to form a film having a nominal thickness of 3000 angstrom. Indium isthen evaporated onto the cadmium sulphide film while the substrate is held at 200 C to form an indium film having a thickness of about 200 angstrom. Both films are deposited in succession without breaking the vacuum. Heating the coated glass substrate at 5OO0C for one hour increases optical transmittance properties and markedly reduces the resistivity. More specifically, a glass substrate coated with a 3000 angstrom cadmium sulphide f'fm exhibits an 80 percent transmission at 600 nm and a sheet resistivity of 5 x 10 ohm-cm. Glass coated with a 3000 angstrom layer of cadmiu? sulphide and 200 angstrom layer of indium exhibits after heat treatment at 500 C for one hour, an 83 percent transmission at 600 nm and a sheet resistivity of 0.05 ohm-cm. This technique also permits the use of very thin films of cadmium sulphide instead of thicker (10 to 20 microns) films currently used in the fabrication of solar cells.

Volume 7 Number...