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LOW COST ROS PRINTER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024915D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 6 page(s) / 257K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An electrosensitive ROS printer comprises a stylus head in the form of a rotatable disc with radially disposed styli which is rotated over a linearly moving recording medium. A dot matrix format output is provided on the recording medium.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 37% of the total text.

Page 1 of 6

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LOW COST ROS PRINTER 346/150 Cl. U.S. Proposed Anonymous Classification

Int. C1. Gold 15/06

3

Volume 7 Number 5 September/October 1982 325

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 6

LOW COST ROS PRINTER (Cont'd)

September/October 5 Number 7 Volume XEROX 326 DISCLOSURE JOURNAL 1982

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 6

LOW COST ROS PRINTER (Cont'd)

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    XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 7 Number 5 September/October 1982 327

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[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]

Page 4 of 6

LOW COST ROS PRINTER (Cont'd)

An electrosensitive ROS printer comprises a stylus head in the form of a rotatable disc with radially disposed styli which is rotated over a linearly moving recording medium. A dot matrix format output is provided on the recording medium.

As illustrated schematically in Figures 1 and 2, a plurality of radially disposed styli 10 are formed on the bottom surface of a printing disc 12. Data is recorded on the recording medium 14 as the disc 12 is rotated at a rotational velocity, w, with the styli 10 sequentially energized under proper timing. The styli sweep across a horizontal line 17 formed by the recording medium 14 being pulled over a backup electrode bar 16. Bar 16 is maintained at a reference potential, e.g., ground, and maintains proper tension on the recording medium. This particular arrangement allows a large number of spatially disposed dots 18 to be printed at high speed with the utmost mechanical simplicity. As shown in Figure 2, medium 14 is taken from supply roll 11 and passes over backup electrode bar 16 and thence under guide roll
17. Medium movement is accomplished by a worm gear connected via a drive belt to a drive train which, in turn, drives the recording medium drive roller (not shown).

The styli 10 and the horizontal bar 16 provide an intersection of two geometries (radius of a circle and a chord) which form a single point at the instance of signal addressing of a particular stylus. The electrical exposure length of each stylus is from the edge of the disc 12 to the point of maximum crossing of each stylus with horizontal line 17. This point is indicated at 20 in Figure 1 and is characterized as the useful length of the stylus.

The writing speed of a stylus 10 along the recording medium 14 is not linear but rather is a function of disc position as well as disc rotational speed. This nonlinearity must be compensated electronically because the dot density will be greater along the center 13 of the medium, where the writing speed is the slowest, as compared to the dot density along the regions adjacent to recording medium edges 15, where the writing speed is the fastest.

Where multip...