Browse Prior Art Database

FULL FRAME STOPPED BELT SYSTEM(S)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024966D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

It has been proposed that a dual vacuum tensioning chamber arrangement be used to isolate motion of a portion of the photoreceptor belt in a xerographic system to permit raster scanning operations to be carried out asynchronously. The balance of the xerographic operations including exposure would on the other hand occur on the remainder of the photoreceptor belt which could continue to travel at a uniform rate.

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FULL FRAh4E STOPPED BELT SYSTEfi.46) Christopher Snelling
Pierre Lavallee

Proposed Classification
U.S. Cl. 355/16 Int. Cl. G03g 21/00

FIG. /

Volume 8 Number 1 January/February 1983 51

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FULL FRAME STOPPED BELT SYSTEM6) (Cont'd)

It has been proposed that a dual vacuum tensioning chamber arrangement be used to isolate motion of a portion of the photoreceptor belt in a xerographic system to permit raster scanning operations to be carried out asynchronously. The balance of the xerographic operations including exposure would on the other hand occur on the remainder of the photoreceptor belt which could continue to travel at a uniform rate.

It is the purpose of this disclosure to suggest a configuration in which light/lens exposure also addresses an isolated portion of the belt.

In the system shown in Figure 1, an overlong photoreceptor belt 7 is supported by plural rollers 5, 6 and by main drive rollers 9. Roller 5 is driven by a servo drive 4, separate from the main drive rollers 9. Rollers 5 and 6 would be connected together, perhaps by a separate belt which would also serve to support the belt 7 in the image plane 8, helping to keep the photoreceptor belt 7 flat. The main drive rollers 9 would operate at the xerographic process speed while the servo drive roller 5 would quickly feed fresh "charged" belt from a vacuum chamber 11 near roller 5 to the image plane 8 on demand. This would quickly fill the...