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ENABLING COLOR COPYABILITY WITH BROAD ORGANIC SPECTRUM PHOTORECEPTOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025068D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In some applications involving the exposure of an original to a photoconductor for automatic reproducing machines it is desirable to use a tungsten filament il-lumination device with a photoconductor which is at least in part sensitive in the infrared region. This creates a difficulty since the tungsten illumination device produces radiation in the infrared range and when used to copy certain colored documents inks of certain colors do not absorb radiation in the infrared region. As a result the radiation in the infrared region is reflected by the colored ink image on the document onto the photoconductor, discharging the photoconductor resulting in no copy of the color ink image. This difficulty is solved by placing an inexpensive optical transmission filter material such as stained glass to cover the tungsten illumination integrating cavity surfaces as is illustrated in the figure wherein the tungsten lamp source 10 is placed inside the integrating cavity extrusion 12 which is coated with a suitable filter material 14. A modification of this concept would be to manufacture the tungsten lamp envelope with a filter glass.

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KEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ENABLING COLOR COPYABILITY WITH BROAD ORGANIC SPECTRUM PHOTORECEPTOR
Michael A. Parisi

I

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 355/67 Int. Cl. G03b 27/54

In some applications involving the exposure of an original to a photoconductor for automatic reproducing machines it is desirable to use a tungsten filament il- lumination device with a photoconductor which is at least in part sensitive in the infrared region. This creates a difficulty since the tungsten illumination device produces radiation in the infrared range and when used to copy certain colored documents inks of certain colors do not absorb radiation in the infrared region. As a result the radiation in the infrared region is reflected by the colored ink image on the document onto the photoconductor, discharging the photoconductor resulting in no copy of the color ink image. This difficulty is solved by placing an inexpensive optical transmission filter material such as stained glass to cover the tungsten illumination integrating cavity surfaces as is illustrated in the figure wherein the tungsten lamp source 10 is placed inside the integrating cavity extrusion 12 which is coated with a suitable filter material 14. A modification of this concept would be to manufacture the tungsten lamp envelope with a filter glass.

Volume 8 Number 3 ?/lay/June 1983 267

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 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 8 Number 3 May/June 1983

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