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LOW INERTIA LOW COST POLYGON MOTOR ASSEMBLY FOR ROS APPLICATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025135D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In raster output scanners employing a rotating reflective element, such as a scanning polygon to scan the laser beam across the object being exposed such as the photoreceptor in a xerographic system, component efficiency and cost are usually critical factors in determining the commercial success or failure of the scanner. Among the several components in a raster scanner, one in this cateqory is the motor used to drive the scanning polygon.

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(EROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LOW INERTIA LOW COST POLYGON MOTOR ASSEMBLY FOR ROS APPLI- CATIONS Int. C1. H02p 1/00 JAMES C. Traino

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 318/508

In raster output scanners employing a rotating reflective element, such as a scanning polygon to scan the laser beam across the object being exposed such as the photoreceptor in a xerographic system, component efficiency and cost are usually critical factors in determining the commercial success or failure of the scanner. Among the several components in a raster scanner, one in this cateqory is the motor used to drive the scanning polygon.

The typical motor is, in the interests of maximum economy, built with little regard for the motor's output impedance or for the requirements of the power amplifiers that may be used with the motor. As a result in applications such as raster scanners where, to obtain the best efficiency and power and avoid the need for a regulated power supply, the motor impedance must be closely matched with the power amplifier requirements, it is necessary to employ special relatively expen- sive be., $40+) amplifiers. The alternate is to employ cheaper off-the-shelf amplifiers with mismatched impedances and consequent sacrifice in power and efficiency.

It is proposed instead that the motor be designed with a specific impedance. By controlling the motor parameters, i.e., the number of winding turns, a specific and a relatively high impedance may be deliberately built into the mo...