Browse Prior Art Database

COPIER/DUPLICATOR JOB PROGRAMMER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025151D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

As copier/duplicator products become more feature-rich, the set-up and control time erodes the potential production rates of these machines. The opportunities for mistakes increase and the cost for correction increases. Every page of the original set often requires careful and customized control in order to produce the necessary output from the given set of input documents. Such intervention is confusing, time-consuming, and prone to error.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COPIER/DUPLICATOR JOB PROGRAMMER Proposed Classification George R. Ellis U.S. C1. 364/200

Int. Cl. G06f 1/00

As copier/duplicator products become more feature-rich, the set-up and control time erodes the potential production rates of these machines. The opportunities for mistakes increase and the cost for correction increases. Every page of the original set often requires careful and customized control in order to produce the necessary output from the given set of input documents. Such intervention is confusing, time-consuming, and prone to error.

A "Job Programmer" would permit an entire run to be completely orqanized and specified away from the particular feature-rich product. The Job Programmer, for example, a compact electronic device resembling a calculator, would be used by production personnel or job originators to specify (program) all production options for every page and step of a complex reproduction and finishing sequence. For example, a page number would be selected and displayed and all appropriate options would be keyed-in which pertain to that page or point in the finishing sequence. Any number of such devices could exist so that multiple jobs could be prepared "off-line". The device would retain the control information or commands in memory and memory contents could be protected by key or "pass word". The operator would sequence the original material as appropriate, load the machine, and attached or insert the Job Programmer to make electrical contact.

The copier/duplicator product would access the Job Programmer data and an internal computer would scan and analyze the sequence prior to initiation. Vissing control information, ambiguous requirem...