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INSTANTANEOUS, DRY, ERASABLE OPTICAL RECORDING MATERIAL HAVING HIGH SENSITIVITY IN THE NEAR INFRARED

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025155D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A polymer layer such as a copolymer of styrene and hexylmethacrylate is coated with a suspension of fine organic infrared sensitive particles such as metal free x-phthalocyanine or vanadyl phthalocyanine in a suitable liquid such as methanol or Isopar G which are non-solvents for the polymer. Application may be effected by a gravure coating process followed by allowing the liquid to evaporate to form a layer of particles. The layer of particles is induced to sink into the polymer and form a subsurface monolayer by softening the polymer with a suitable vapor. If the initial particle concentration and gravure size are properly selected, the monolayer can be quite dense. In order to obtain small particles in the film, and hence reasonable photographic resolution, dispersing agents are utilized in the spreading liquid to prevent flocculation of the particles. Typical dispersing agents include Triton x-114 in methanol dispersions and OMS (a commercial terpolymer) or Nirez (a commercial polyterpene resin) in Isopar G dispersions. Since metal free x-phthalocyanine and vanadyl phthalocyanine absorb strongly in the visible light region as well as at wavelengths out to about 800 to 900 nm, these structures may be used as infrared sensitive and nearly panchromatic electrophotographic dry development films. After charging and imagewise exposure, development may be accomplished by heat, solvent, vapor, or liquid ink toning. Interestingly, while liquid or vapor development provides pure migration images, heat-developed images appear to be due partly to migration but largely to frosting so that the best contrast with heat development will be achieved with scattering-type optical systems. This, of course, means that such images are erasable merely by heatincz;. Unlike conventional dry migration imaging, the unexposed particles in all cases move under migration (and/or frost) development thereby permitting photograohic sign reversal with heat or vapor development.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

INSTANTANEOUS. DRY .ERASABLE OPTICAL RECORDING MATERIAL HAVING HIGH SENSITIVITY IN THE NEAR INFRARED

Proposed Classification
U.S. CI. 430/41 Int. C1. G03g 13/00

G. J. Kovacs
P. S. Vincett

A polymer layer such as a copolymer of styrene and hexylmethacrylate is coated with a suspension of fine organic infrared sensitive particles such as metal free x- phthalocyanine or vanadyl phthalocyanine in a suitable liquid such as methanol or Isopar G which are non-solvents for the polymer. Application may be effected by a gravure coating process followed by allowing the liquid to evaporate to form a layer of particles. The layer of particles is induced to sink into the polymer and form a subsurface monolayer by softening the polymer with a suitable vapor. If the initial particle concentration and gravure size are properly selected, the monolayer can be quite dense. In order to obtain small particles in the film, and hence reasonable photographic resolution, dispersing agents are utilized in the spreading liquid to prevent flocculation of the particles. Typical dispersing agents include Triton x-114 in methanol dispersions and OMS (a commercial terpolymer) or Nirez (a commercial polyterpene resin) in Isopar G dispersions. Since metal free x- phthalocyanine and vanadyl phthalocyanine absorb strongly in the visible light region as well as at wavelengths out to about 800 to 900 nm, these structures may be used as infrared sensitive and nearly panchromatic electrophotographic dry development films. After charging and imagewise exposure, development may be accomplished by heat, solvent, vapor, or liquid ink toning. Interestingly, while liquid or vapor development provides pure migration images, heat-developed images appear to be due partly to migration but largely to frosting so that the best contrast with heat development will be achieved with scattering-type optical systems. This, of course, means that such images are erasable merely by heatincz;. Unlike conventional dry migration imaging, the unexposed particles in all cases move under migration (and/or frost) development thereby permi...