Browse Prior Art Database

VACUUM CORRUGATION FEEDER SHEET ACQUISITION AID

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025240D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In vacuum corrugation feeders as disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,324,395, a need has been shown to reduce air knife flow for more rapid sheet acquisition. This is especially desirable when acquisition times are long (> 200ms) or when system timing would prefer a short acquisition time as in high performance recirculating document handlers. Long acquisition times occur mainly when the sheet stack is "high" with respect to the vacuum plenum ports, and the stack is "stiff" i.e., curl up, high stack, heavy weight paper.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

VACUUM CORRUGATION FEEDER SHEET ACQUISITION AID U.S. C1. 137/802 John Maksymiak

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. E03b 21/00

BLOWER

A

t

FEEDER

In vacuum corrugation feeders as disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,324,395, a need has been shown to reduce air knife flow for more rapid sheet acquisition. This is especially desirable when acquisition times are long (> 200ms) or when system timing would prefer a short acquisition time as in high performance recirculating document handlers. Long acquisition times occur mainly when the sheet stack is "high" with respect to the vacuum plenum ports, and the stack is "stiff" i.e., curl up, high stack, heavy weight paper.

In the figure, an aid to sheet acquisition is shown that utilizes the vacuum level at the blower inlet to sense an air "open port" condition and automatically "dump" some or all of the air knife flow. It is also desirable to design the system to not reduce air flow for "good" stacks in order to maintain high feeding reliability. This is accomplished by damping the valve actuation or designing for a low natural frequency (i.e., 10 Hz) so that the valve does not open for short (5 100ms) acquisition times.

Volume 9 Number 2 March/April 1984 97

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  XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 9 Number 2 March/April 1984

98

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