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TRANSPARENT DRAIN PADS FOR LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAYS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025349D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Referring to the accompanying figure, a typical cell 10 of an actively addressed liquid crystal display (LCD) is schematically shown. Its main elements are the source line 12, gate line 14, and thin film transistor 16 with its drain pad 18. All of the elements, of course, are on a transparent substrate 20, one of two that sandwiched the liquid crystal material. For a light transmissive or rear illuminated type LCD, the drain pad must be transparent and is generally constructed of indium tin oxide (ITO).

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Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

TRANSPARENT DRAIN PADS FOR LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAYS U.S. C1. 29/571
William G. Hawkins

Proposed Classification

Int. CI. HOlg 7/00

355 Volume 9 Number 6 November/December 1984

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TRANSPARENT DRAIN PADS FOR LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAYS (Cont'd)

Referring to the accompanying figure, a typical cell 10 of an actively addressed liquid crystal display (LCD) is schematically shown. Its main elements are the source line 12, gate line 14, and thin film transistor 16 with its drain pad 18. All of the elements, of course, are on a transparent substrate 20, one of two that sandwiched the liquid crystal material. For a light transmissive or rear illuminated type LCD, the drain pad must be transparent and is generally constructed of indium tin oxide (ITO).

By using degeneratively doped CVD polycrystalline silicon 150 nm to 500 nm thick for the drain pad instead of ITO, the following advantages may be obtained:

* Ease of deposition (100 wafers/hours)

* Easily etched by plasma processing

* Subsequent high temperature processing is possible

* Very transparent thin film is achieved which is highly conductive (about 30 to 60 ohm/square)

                XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL 3 56 Volume 9 Number 6 November/December 1984

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