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A SEGMENTED VARIABLE DRIVER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025355D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 146K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

It is known that driving an array of ink jet streams presents problems, if the width of the array is of sufficient length that it can resonate at a significantly lower frequency than the design operating frequency. If this case occurs, width mode oscillations will occur and will produce unwanted perturbations in the fluid. These problems may be minimized or eliminated by creating a driver consisting of small point sources of energy. Such a driver is created by dicing PZT into a mosaic pattern consisting of cubic volumes with dimensions of significantly less length or width than the wavelength of the operating frequency.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

A SEGMENTED VARIABLE DRIVER Proposed Roger R. D. Snyder Classification

U.S. CI. 346/75

Int. CI. Gold 15/18

It is known that driving an array of ink jet streams presents problems, if the width of the array is of sufficient length that it can resonate at a significantly lower frequency than the design operating frequency. If this case occurs, width mode oscillations will occur and will produce unwanted perturbations in the fluid. These problems may be minimized or eliminated by creating a driver consisting of small point sources of energy. Such a driver is created by dicing PZT into a mosaic pattern consisting of cubic volumes with dimensions of significantly less length or width than the wavelength of the operating frequency.

If a diced mosaic PZT driver is utilized, the kerf separating each cube offers the basis of a means to segment the driver into cubic arrays of varying dimensions. Varying the number of point sources (and/or varying the active surface areas of the individual driving cubes) for any particular matrix area can create a drive source with variations in drive level not available in typical piezoelectric driver arrays. However, this procedure presents limitations because the drive levels are fixed upon construction. Consequently, the required drive for each area must be known in advance of manufacturing. A more flexible means is to vary the signal level to each significant section of the array.

If a fixed-level signal source is supplied to a set of individual, variable-electrical driver elements, the variable drive signals can then be fed to the individual PZT matrices to provide appropriate levels of drive to the desired areas of the array. This method provides the capability to tailor the drive levels after the parts are manufactured and assembled. For example, a plurality of PZT mosaic segments may be utilized to provide driving energy over any length or width of array, thus allowing development flexibility to cover any image area.

One method of creating the mosaic driver is to bond the PZT mosaic in a manner which places the driving surfaces of the individual point source cubes against the surface to be driven. This provides maximum isolation between the various boundries of the desired areas to be driven. The opposite surface of the mosaic pattern is then bonded to a piece of conductive material, such as a tuning stub made of stainless steel, which serves as the other electrical connection in the signal path. The tuning stub can be constructed of individual pieces having a dimension corresponding to the desired driving area of the individual segments or it can be made from a solid piece of material of the appropriate dimensions and then cut into individual segments.

Individual driving matrices can be produced from a solid tuning stub by sawing or cutting the tuning stub into appropriate sections. In practice, it is simple to create the divisions in the tuning stub by cutting or machining...