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NOVEL CONDUCTIVE FILMS TO ACT AS STATIC ELIMINATOR DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025394D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In making copies in automatic office copying machines it frequently happens that static electrical charges are generated by contact of the copy paper, which is a dielectric material, with various parts of the office machine. Discharge devices have been used to remove this static charge of build-up on the copy sheets. It has been common practice in the past to employ tinsel type devices at the output of a machine to dissipate charge in advance of the operator coming into contact or proximity to the copy sheet. These tinsel type devices typically take the form of a plurality of metal projections on the electrically grounded support. A new type of static eliminator device is now proposed which comprises the use of a thin conductive film as a static eliminator "brush". This is accomplished by die cutting fiber like tentacles in the film which can serve as the fibers to contact static laden copies as they move through the machine. The die cutting process of various film thickness allows a wide selection of tip geometries and/or configurations. In addition, the opportunity also exists to utilize several layers of cut strips to optimize the number of tentacles contacting the copy. Typical of the materials that may be used to form these brushes are the thin, electrically conductive, solvent cast, carbon filled, polymeric films produced for example by Kimberly Clark Corporation under the name KIMFLOW which is a conductive polycarbonate based film. These materials exhibit excellent conductivity having a volume resistivity as low as 0.36 ohms cm resulting from the uniform dispersion of carbon black particles throughout the polycarbonate resin base. In addition to the films conductivity, they are flexible, tough, moisture proof and stable over a wide range of temperatures up to 130 degrees C.

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'XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

In making copies in automatic office copying machines it frequently happens that static electrical charges are generated by contact of the copy paper, which is a dielectric material, with various parts of the office machine. Discharge devices have been used to remove this static charge of build-up on the copy sheets. It has been common practice in the past to employ tinsel type devices at the output of a machine to dissipate charge in advance of the operator coming into contact or proximity to the copy sheet. These tinsel type devices typically take the form of a plurality of metal projections on the electrically grounded support. A new type of static eliminator device is now proposed which comprises the use of a thin conductive film as a static eliminator "brush". This is accomplished by die cutting fiber like tentacles in the film which can serve as the fibers to contact static laden copies as they move through the machine. The die cutting process of various film thickness allows a wide selection of tip geometries and/or configurations. In addition, the opportunity also exists to utilize several layers of cut strips to optimize the number of tentacles contacting the copy. Typical of the materials that may be used to form these brushes are the thin, electrically conductive, solvent cast, carbon filled, polymeric films produced for example by Kimberly Clark Corporation under the name KIMFLOW which is a conductive polycarbonate based fi...