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COMBINATION BELT SENSOR AND GROUNDING DEVICE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025407D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The use of a grounded metal brush in contact with a photoreceptor belt to maintain the conductive layer of the belt at grounded potential as it moves through the xerographic processing stations in an xerographic copier is known in the art. Because photoreceptor belts commonly have at least one seam, it is often necessary to be able to sense such a seam in order to start a timing cycle. This sensing has been accomplished by various means including photoelectric type sensors which are known in the art.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COMBINATION BELT SENSOR AND GROUNDING DEVICE
Joseph Fantuzzo

Proposed Classification
U.S. CI. 355/3BE Int. CI. G03g 15/00

The use of a grounded metal brush in contact with a photoreceptor belt to maintain the conductive layer of the belt at grounded potential as it moves through the xerographic processing stations in an xerographic copier is known in the art. Because photoreceptor belts commonly have at least one seam, it is often necessary to be able to sense such a seam in order to start a timing cycle. This sensing has been accomplished by various means including photoelectric type sensors which are known in the art.

The present proposal relates to an effort to combine the above functions. A grounded metal brush is placed in contact with the photoreceptor belt near one of its edges. Directly opposite the brush, on the other side of the belt, a metal plate is located. This metal plate is connected to a sensing circuit. There is a hole in the belt at the seam in the track traced by the brush as the belt moves. As the belt passes the grounded metal brush any electrical charge on the belt is discharged. When the hole in the belt passes between the brush and the plate, the sensing circuit is completed. In this fashion both the electrical grounding and seam-sensing functions are done by the sarne device, effectively and at low cost.

Volume 10 Number 2 March/April 1985 77

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