Browse Prior Art Database

OPTICAL PEN MOUSE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025430D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 181K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The mechanical cursor control device oi "mouse" has now been extensively used for several years in connection with personal computers and computer workstations as a means to move the visible cursor on the display screen of the computer. One example of such a successful mechanical mouse is disclosed in US. Patent 3,835,464, now certificate B1 3,835,464 issued November 20, 1984. More recently, the design of the optical mouse has come into prominence as a cursor control device. A principal advantage of the optical mouse is less moving parts providing for longer trouble-free use. One example of an optical mouse is in the article of Richard F.'Lyon entitled, "The Optical Mouse & An Architectural Methodology for Smart Digital Sensors", CMU Conference on VLSI Systems & Computations, October 19-21, 1981, pp. 1-19, published by Computer Science Press, Inc. and U.S. patent application Serial No. 457,805, filed January 13, 1983 and cited references therein. The optical mouse utilizes a light source and sensor array comprising a field of photodetectors supported in a housing. The housing is moved over a patterned surface comprising a plurality of contrasting features, e.g., light or dark dots on a respectively contrasting dark or light background. The pattern of features is focused on the sensor array of the mouse which provides positional information indicative of mouse housing movement and direction relative to the pattern. Details relating to circuitry and operation are disclosed in the above-mentioned article and patent application.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

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OPTICAL PEN MOUSE Anonymous

Proposed Classification US. CI. 340/710
Int. CI.CO9f 9/30

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Volume 10 Number 3 May/June 1985

56&3!:8

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[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

OPTICAL PEN MOUSE (Cont'd)

The mechanical cursor control device oi "mouse" has now been extensively used for several years in connection with personal computers and computer workstations as a means to move the visible cursor on the display screen of the computer. One example of such a successful mechanical mouse is disclosed in US. Patent 3,835,464, now certificate B1 3,835,464 issued November 20, 1984. More recently, the design of the optical mouse has come into prominence as a cursor control device. A principal advantage of the optical mouse is less moving parts providing for longer trouble-free use. One example of an optical mouse is in the article of Richard F.'Lyon entitled, "The Optical Mouse & An Architectural Methodology for Smart Digital Sensors", CMU Conference on VLSI Systems & Computations, October 19-21, 1981, pp. 1-19, published by Computer Science Press, Inc. and U.S. patent application Serial No. 457,805, filed January 13, 1983 and cited references therein. The optical mouse utilizes a light source and sensor array comprising a field of photodetectors supported in a housing. The housing is moved over a patterned surface comprising a plurality of contrasting features,
e.g., light or dark dots on a respectively contrasting dark or light background. The pattern of features is focused on the sensor array of the mouse which provides positional information indicative of mouse housing movement and direction relative to the pattern. Details relating to circuitry and operation are disclosed in the above-mentioned article and patent application.

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There are applications for such cursor control devices where the utilization of a featured pattern surface may be an undesirable restriction. Such a pattern must always be available for use with the optical mouse; otherwise, the optical mouse will have no functional utility without it.

What we propose is a means by which the featured pattern may become part of the mouse.

In Figure I, there is disclosed an optical pen mouse 10 comprising a two section pen housing comprising a lower section 12 and upper section 14 joined at 15. A feature patterned ball 18 is supported in the lower end of section 12 by the encompassing tip 20. Ball 18 is mounted in the section cavity 22 on the ball supporting seat 16, which may, for example, be Teflon. Then, the tip 20 of section 12 is shrunk around the ball 18 by well known and conventional methods to embrace the ball 18 within cavity 22. Ball 18 is quite similar in appearance to a golf ball and is marked with a feature pattern, for example, a uniform pattern of light dots on a dark background or a uniform pattern of dark dots on a light background. The ball may alternati...