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Browse Prior Art Database

IMPROVED FILM SUBSTRATE FOR TYPEWRITER RIBBONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025447D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Most typewriter and printer ribbons today are comprised of an ink resin coating on a thin gauge film made from either cast high density polyethylene or polyester film. Upon impact the ink coating releases from the film base and transfers to the paper thus forming an image. Most current films today use ribbon substrates about 0.5 mil in thickness. Since most ribbon cartridges specify a maximum roll diameter, the substrate thickness becomes a limiting factor of the ribbon length. Currently produced correctable high yield ribbons are. made of about 500 foot lengths and a thickness of about 0.5 mils. This appears to be the lower limit of processing cast polyethylene because the film loses its stiffness and tensile strength at lower calipers which could create functional problems and result in ribbon breakage.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

IMPROVED FILM SUBSTRATE FOR TYPEWRITER RIBBONS Larry R. Sagneri

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 400/241 Int. C1. B41j 33/00

Most typewriter and printer ribbons today are comprised of an ink resin coating on a thin gauge film made from either cast high density polyethylene or polyester film. Upon impact the ink coating releases from the film base and transfers to the paper thus forming an image. Most current films today use ribbon substrates about 0.5 mil in thickness. Since most ribbon cartridges specify a maximum roll diameter, the substrate thickness becomes a limiting factor of the ribbon length. Currently produced correctable high yield ribbons are. made of about 500 foot lengths and a thickness of about 0.5 mils. This appears to be the lower limit of processing cast polyethylene because the film loses its stiffness and tensile strength at lower calipers which could create functional problems and result in ribbon breakage.

The present disclosure is directed to the substitution of blown high density polyethylene for the cast rnaterial due to its stiffness characteristics and tendency to orient resulting from the blowing process. The film could then be extruded at lower calipers of the order of 0.2 to 0.3 mils, for example, which would result in a substantial increase of approximately 63 percent or an additional 300 feet of ribbon per cartridge. In terms of characters per ribbon, current correctable high yield films of 500 feet long...