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PAPER FLATTENING METHOD FOR DIRECT ION WRITING ON PAPER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025453D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

When ordinary paper is heated to dry it for direct ion writing thereon, varying degrees of cockling or wrinkling usually occur. This phenomenon causes severe imaging problems at the ion deposition (writing) station, the toning station and possibly at the fusing station. Furthermore, a wrinkled output print is aesthetically unacceptable.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PAPER FLATTENING METHOD FOR DIRECT ION WRITING ON PAPER
Gene Franklin Day
David Jay Woods

Proposed Classification
U.S. Cl. 34/12 Int. CI. F26b 7/00

TO WRITING STAT1 0 N

10-

41

FIG. 2

Volume 10 Number 4 July/August 1985 179

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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PAPER FLATTENING METHOD FOR DIRECT ION WRITING ON PAPER (Cont'd)

When ordinary paper is heated to dry it for direct ion writing thereon, varying degrees of cockling or wrinkling usually occur. This phenomenon causes severe imaging problems at the ion deposition (writing) station, the toning station and possibly at the fusing station. Furthermore, a wrinkled output print is aesthetically unacceptable.

An arrangement is proposed herein for largely eliminating cockling. Two embodiments are illustrated (Figures 1 and 2). A web of ordinary paper 10 having a high (about 5.5%) water content is transported to a downstream writing station (not shown) after being heated in order to drive out deleterious moisture. In Figure 1, the heater is shown to be a roller 12 against which the paper is driven. In Figure 2, the heater is shown to be a low thermal mass heater 14 adjacent a support shoe 16. A flat ironing plate 18 is pressed against the opposite surface of the paper while it is still hot and moist so as to "iron out" the wrinkles.

Many embodiments are possible as long as the paper is pressed flat after heating has begun and before drying is complete. For example...