Browse Prior Art Database

SORTER DRIVE SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025460D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In a moving bin sorter, the trays are spaced a minimum distance from each other until they pass the sheet loading area. Then they are separated a wider distance in order lo facilitate sheet loading. At this wider gap area, the position of the trays relative to the input chute must be controlled precisely. If the lower tray stops at a position higher than its nominal position, or if the upper tray stops at a position lower than nominal, the incoming sheet may collide with the backstop, thus causing a paper jam. At the same time, it is important to keep this "wider" gap as small as possible to insure a relatively low pressure angle on the vertical carns (which elevate the trays) and to keep the diameter of the cams relatively small to keep their cost and volume low.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SORTER DRIVE SYSTEM
Proposed D. 3. Stemmle C 1 assification

U.S. Cl. 271/293 Int. C1. B65h 5/04

In a moving bin sorter, the trays are spaced a minimum distance from each other until they pass the sheet loading area. Then they are separated a wider distance in order lo facilitate sheet loading. At this wider gap area, the position of the trays relative to the input chute must be controlled precisely. If the lower tray stops at a position higher than its nominal position, or if the upper tray stops at a position lower than nominal, the incoming sheet may collide with the backstop, thus causing a paper jam. At the same time, it is important to keep this "wider" gap as small as possible to insure a relatively low pressure angle on the vertical carns (which elevate the trays) and to keep the diameter of the cams relatively small to keep their cost and volume low.

Some sorters solve this problem by driving the vertical cams with an expensive stepper motor system. With such a system, the motor can be stopped in a precise and repeatable position, thus stopping the rotation of the vertical cams, (and thus the sorter trays) in a precise and repeatable position.

The present proposal is an alternative drive system which puts sufficient flat section on the vertical cams such that the stop position of the cams can vary over a significent amount of rotation while keeping the stop position of the trays fixed. Because much less precision is required in th...