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HIGH RESOLUTION, HIGH EFFICIENCY INFRARED LED PRINTING ARRAY AND FABRICATION METHOD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025514D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 8 page(s) / 337K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

With the advent of commercially available infrared (IR) photoreceptors, the use of a Light Emitting Diode (LED) array to write images on the photoreceptor has taken on renewed interest. As will be understood, arrays of this type comprise one or more linear rows of LEDs in close juxtaposition with one another to form in effect a light bar which, through selective actuation of the individual LEDs in accordance with an image.input signal, exposes the photoreceptor to create or write a latent electrostatic image thereon. The latent electrostatic image created is thereafter processed xerographical I y to produce a permanent visible copy of the image.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

Page 1 of 8

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

HIGH RESOLUTION, HIGH EFFICIENCY INFRARED LED PRINTING ARRAY U.S. C1. 29/569L
AND FABRICATION METHOD Int. C1. HOll 7/00 Joseph J. Daniele

Proposed Classification

FIG /

- Ga As-p oRGal-zAIz As-p

As-n Al, Ga 1 -- Ga As-n SUBSTRATE

1

FIG 2

I- 37-1 //

Volume 10 Number 6 November/December 1985 313

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 8

HIGH RESOLUTION, HIGH EFFICIENCY INFRARED LED PRINTING ARRAY AND FABRICATION METHOD (Cont'd)

314

l2 -f- +GaAs-n SUBSTRATE

FK 4

B36'

-

w

     XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 10 Number 6 November/December 1985

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 8

HIGH RESOLUTION, HIGH EFFICIENCY INFRARED LED PRINTING ARRAY AND FABRICATION METHOD (Cont'd)

GaAs

FIG. 5

- p OR Ga, -z Al As -p

F/G 6

Y

59

     XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 10 Number 6 November/Decernber 1985 315

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 4 of 8

HIGH RESOLUTION, HIGH EFFICIENCY INFRARED LED PRINTING ARRAY AND FABRICATION METHOD (Cont'd)

316

FIG 7

I

12 I4

FIG. 8

24

22

     XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 10 Number 6 November/December 1985

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 5 of 8

HIGH RESOLUTION, HIGH EFFICIENCY INFRARED LED PRINTING ARRAY AND FABRICATION METHOD (Cont'd)

With the advent of commercially available infrared (IR) photoreceptors, the use of a Light Emitting Diode (LED) array to write images on the photoreceptor has taken on renewed interest. As will be understood, arrays of this type comprise one or more linear rows of LEDs in close juxtaposition with one another to form in effect a light bar which, through selective actuation of the individual LEDs in accordance with an image.input signal, exposes the photoreceptor to create or write a latent electrostatic image thereon. The latent electrostatic image created is thereafter processed xerographical I y to produce a permanent visible copy of the image.

This renewed interest is primarily due to the fact that IR LEDs can be made with an efficiency more than an order of magnitude, and in some cases two orders of magnitude, greater than present day visible LEDs. Moreover, because of recent advances in materials preparation, such as Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), IR LEDs can now be made from direct gap commercially viable materials like Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) or Gallium Aluminum Arsenide (GaAIAs) in heterostructures which show reliability and uniformity much superior to previous visible LEDs. However, because these high efficiency IR LED arrays are structured differently than previous LED arrays, IR LED arrays have their own constraints and advantages.

Because of past photoreceptor spectral limitations and the consequent unavailability of IR photorceptors, LED arrays are currently made from zinc diffused Gallium Arsenide Phosphide (Ga(As,P)) grown epitaxiaIly on Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) or Gallium Phosphide (Gap). As will be unde...