Browse Prior Art Database

PAPER STACKER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025518D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A paper stacker can be as simple as a box which is positioned in a manner to catch paper as it leaves a machine or as complex as a belt driven feeding mechanism which properly orientates the paper while placing it into a stack. One drawback common with known stackers is that machine operators must wait for the paper to stop feeding before removing it from the stacker. This presents a major problem in medium to high volume machines where a typical run may exceed two hundred copies. In order to improve efficiency, operators would like to remove finished copies before the run is complete. To accommodate this desire, disclosed in Figures 1 - 4 is a paper stacker that allows paper removal while copies are in the process of being fed into it.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PAPER STACKER Proposed Leo Francis Schwab Classification

US. CI. 271/278 Int. Cl. B65h 5/02

Volume 10 Number 6 November/December 1985 329

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Page 2 of 4

PAPER STACKER (Cont'd)

                XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL 330 Volume 10 Number 6 November/December 1985

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 4

PAPER STACKER (Cont'd)

A paper stacker can be as simple as a box which is positioned in a manner to catch paper as it leaves a machine or as complex as a belt driven feeding mechanism which properly orientates the paper while placing it into a stack. One drawback common with known stackers is that machine operators must wait for the paper to stop feeding before removing it from the stacker. This presents a major problem in medium to high volume machines where a typical run may exceed two hundred copies. In order to improve efficiency, operators would like to remove finished copies before the run is complete. To accommodate this desire, disclosed in Figures 1 - 4 is a paper stacker that allows paper removal while copies are in the process of being fed into it.

The stacker is a passive type in that the paper is allowed to travel under its own motion due to inertia and gravity. As seen in Figure 1, paper enters the stacker 10 through feed roll pairs and is initially in contact with a first baffle 12 which deflects the paper toward the bottom tray portion 15 of the stacker. A secon...