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ELECTRODES FOR ORGANIC ELECTROLUMINESCENCE USING HIGH FIELD EMISSION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025582D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Electroluminesence from organic materials has been suggested for a light source for image bars or as an organic light emitting diode (LED) Until recently, a major obstacle in utilizing this technology has been the dlficulty of injecting both signed carriers into these materials. In the case of blue emitting materials, electrons are more difficult to inject than holes, and require extremely low work function metals such as sohum or potassium. These latter electrodes are not practical for a variety of reasons including irreproducibility, stability, and hazard level. Thus, it is desired to inject charge carriers into organic insulator or semiconductors which will allow the electrical characteristics of these materials to be utilized.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ELECTRODES FOR ORGANIC Proposed Classification ELECTROLUMINESCENCE USING U S C1.325/169 HIGH FIELD EMISSION
Robert W. Anderson
Lawrence B Schein
Peter A. Torpey
Ram Narang

Int. C1. M05b 37/00

Electroluminesence from organic materials has been suggested for a light source for image bars or as an organic light emitting diode (LED) Until recently, a major obstacle in utilizing this technology has been the dlficulty of injecting both signed carriers into these materials. In the case of blue emitting materials, electrons are more difficult to inject than holes, and require extremely low work function metals such as sohum or potassium. These latter electrodes are not practical for a variety of reasons including irreproducibility, stability, and hazard level. Thus, it is desired to inject charge carriers into organic insulator or semiconductors which will allow the electrical characteristics of these materials to be utilized.

A new electrode system, described herein, has been demonstrated to inject both signed charge carriers into anthracene crystals and allowing electrolurninesence to be produced. The new electrodes utilize the high electric fields known to be associated with the edges of a thin conductive line or lines deposited on, or in contact with the organic material as a means of altering the energy requirements for carrier injection into the material As a result, metals such as gold and silver have been shown to inject both electrons and ho...