Browse Prior Art Database

FOUR POINT SUPPORT FOR COPIERS AND THE LIKE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025597D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 6 page(s) / 248K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A historical problem with machine supports such as typically used to support floor and desk top machines such as copiers, is that floor unevenness requires that one, two, or all of the support legs, which may for example comprise casters, be spring loaded in order to prevent rocking of the machine caused by one support leg not contacting the floor. While many four-legged supports used with appliances such as refrigerators have adjustable supports in the form of screw legs built in to enable any unevenness in the supporting surface to be compensated for by turning the screw, the fine adjustment often required is sometimes difficult to make due to nearby structural items such as walls, adjacent equipment, atc.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 44% of the total text.

Page 1 of 6

CEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FOUR POINT SUPPORT FOR COPIERS AND THE LIKE
Lam Fun Wong

Proposed Classification U S, CI 2481188 3
Int. Cl. F16m 11/24

Volume 11 Number 4 July/August 1986 159

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 6

FOUR POINT SUPPORT FOR COPIERS AND THE LIKE (Cont'd)

XEROX 160 DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

Volume fl Number 4 Ju%y/August 1985

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 6

FOUR POINT SUPPORT FOR COPIERS AND THE LIKE (Cont'd)

  XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 11 Number 4 JulyIAugust 1986 161

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 4 of 6

FOUR POINT SUPPORT FOR COPIERS AND THE LIKE (Cont'd)

A historical problem with machine supports such as typically used to support floor and desk top machines such as copiers, is that floor unevenness requires that one, two, or all of the support legs, which may for example comprise casters, be spring loaded in order to prevent rocking of the machine caused by one support leg not contacting the floor. While many four-legged supports used with appliances such as refrigerators have adjustable supports in the form of screw legs built in to enable any unevenness in the supporting surface to be compensated for by turning the screw, the fine adjustment often required is sometimes difficult to make due to nearby structural items such as walls, adjacent equipment, atc.

Referring to Figures 1-3 of the drawings, a four point support 10 for supporting a load such as copier 12 level in spite of unevenness in the supporting surface such as a floor 14 has its operating principle in the spatial geometry of a tetrahedron (shown by dotted lines 4 in Figure 2) Any common point 15 contained inside tetrahedron 4 represents a unique set of four distances between that point and the four vertices 5 of the tetrahedron Common point 15 is always contained inside tetrahedron 4. A change in the distance between point 15 and one of the vertices 5 will cause the same amount of compensating displacement in each of the remaining distances between common point 15 and the other vertices. Theoretically, there are an infinite number of points contained within a tetrahedron which provide an infinite set of displacement relationships, each set accommodating a unique case of supporting surface unevenness which can be compensated for. The severity of unevenness of floor 14 which can be accommodated by support 10 is directly proportional to the physical size of the tetrahedron 4 formed The physical placement of the tetrahedron rn the support 10 is completely arbitrary.

Support 10 has a generally rectangular frame 19 with a vertical piston-like leg or stud 20 at each corner of frame 19. Leg 20 is slidably received in a cylinder 22 which may be integral with frame I9 at each corner. A soft spring 24 trapped between the closed end wall of cylinder 22 and leg 20 biases leg 20 downwardly. Conveniently, the lower or floor engagmg end of leg 20 may be widened at 27 t...