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PAPER HOLDDOWN/REGISTRATION USING ADHESIVE SHEET

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025732D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A problem exists for direct marking technologies, such as thermal ink jet printing systems because the printed sheet must be held to the desired flatness and position at some angle between horizontal and vertical against the force of gravity. Existing models have employed vacuum holddown platens to accomplish this function, but this method is both costly and unreliable.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PAPER H 0 LDD 0 WN/RE GI ST RATIO N USING ADHESIVE SHEET U.S. C1.355/3R Steven J. Diet1

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03g 15/00

A problem exists for direct marking technologies, such as thermal ink jet printing systems because the printed sheet must be held to the desired flatness and position at some angle between horizontal and vertical against the force of gravity. Existing models have employed vacuum holddown platens to accomplish this function, but this method is both costly and unreliable.

One cost effective solution is to laminate a sticky holddown sheet onto the platen in question to hold the sheet in position. This sticky material should have properties similar to the 3M Post-It@ Note Pads or other similar sticky bulletin boards currently on the market. This concept would also allow for a vertical electronic reprographic device in which the original is stuck to the inside of the platen cover and then the cover closed. In an ink jet printing system, a platen glass would not then be needed, and the customer could have easy access to the ink supply cartridges for their replacem.ent.

The sticky substance could be easily replaced by the customer when the tack force becomes unacceptable.

The advantage of this method of holding printing surfaces is that some thermal ink jet configurations have not been demonstrated to propel droplets vertically down and, therefore, the ink receiving sheets must be held between 60 degrees and vertica...