Browse Prior Art Database

SEPARABLE TIMING BELT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025759D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Timing belts of the type required to control a sequence of operations in complex mechanical devices are generally comprised of continuous molded members. When a problem occurs with respect to such belts, such as when wear necessitates replacement, it is often necessary to dismantle large portions of the machine to release the belt from the various brackets, shafts, and frames which trap the belt inside the machine.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SEPARABLE TIMING BELT Alan Goldsmith

Proposed Classification
U.S. c1.74 Int. C1. F16h

FIG. I

FIG. 2

FIG. 3

Volume 12 Number 6 November/December 1987

255

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 2

SEPARABLE TIMING BELT Con t 'd)

Timing belts of the type required to control a sequence of operations in complex mechanical devices are generally comprised of continuous molded members. When a problem occurs with respect to such belts, such as when wear necessitates replacement, it is often necessary to dismantle large portions of the machine to release the belt from the various brackets, shafts, and frames which trap the belt inside the machine.

It is proposed that a timing belt be provided with releasably connectable ends whereby the belt may be easily removable and replaceable from its position within a machine. Dismantling of machines would not be necessary as the belt could be easily released from its positioning within a machine.

In accordance with the proposal, Figures 1, 2, and 3 show various embodiments of a timing belt B provided with a joint where belt B may be releasably connected to itself to form the continuous member required for controlling sequential machine operations. The joint may include several different interlocking arrangements. Figure 1 demonstrates a joint where each side is provided with complementary interlocking fingers on each end of the belt. The fingers are locked into position with a remov...