Browse Prior Art Database

SHARED LINE BILLING AND DATA INTERFACE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025770D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Many systems have been proposed for (semi) automatic billing and diagnostics for copiers and other decentralized devices. One method of doing this is by telephone because the network already exists. For example, the operator makes the call (on schedule or request) and places the phone into an acoustic coupler or activates some other type coupler. However, there must be a phone next to the copier. Also, a person must be present who understands the operation. Another important problem is queuing. Most calls will be during business hours and the calls will tend to stack causing key operator frustration.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SHARED LINE BILLING AND DATA INTERFACE U.S. C1.355/14C Craig A. Smith

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03g 15/00

Many systems have been proposed for (semi) automatic billing and diagnostics for copiers and other decentralized devices. One method of doing this is by telephone because the network already exists.

For example, the operator makes the call (on schedule or request) and places the phone into an acoustic coupler or activates some other type coupler. However, there must be a phone next to the copier. Also, a person must be present who understands the operation. Another important problem is queuing. Most calls will be during business hours and the calls will tend to stack causing key operator frustration.

Another method requires the machine to be wired (e.g., via a modem) to a dedicated phone line. The machine can then be called at will to initiate the information transfer. Unfortunately, the customer usually does not want to pay for a dedicated line. It is proposed, therefore, to provide an electronic device that is capable of filtering incoming calls so that specially initiated calls activate the communication line in the machine while all other calls ring through to the normal telephone whose line is shared by the machine. The first ringing impulse would initiate the system to look for a tone code. If the tone code was absent, the call would ring through to the phone. Another method would allow the machine to initiate the call o...