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CURVED RESONATOR SEMI-CONDUCTOR LASER STRUCTURES FABRICATED VIA IMPURITY INDUCED DISORDERING (IID)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025914D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 141K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

It is desirable for many appIications to eliminate the constraint and necessity of having two cleared mirrors as feedback when fabricating a laser cavity in a semiconductor laser device. This is particularly true where such laser devices are integrated into an electro-optic circuit on a semiconductor chip. Thus, monolithic integration of complex circuits with laser emitters is just one example of problems encountered in integration of electro-optic components on a chip. Another example is where a fixed cavity length is necessary for a particular on-chip laser application.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CURVED RESONATOR SEMI- Proposed Classification CONDUCTOR LASER STRUCTURES U.S. C1.372146 FABRICATED VIA IMPURITY
INDUCED DISORDERING (IID)

Robert L. Thornton Robert D. Burnham

Int. C1. HOls 3/19

FIG. IA

1

CLEAVED FACET

FIG. IB

Volume 13 Number 6 NovembedDecember 1988 33 3

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

CURVED RESONATOR SEMICONDUCTOR LASER (Cont'd)

34

II"

34 FIG. ID

FACET CLEAVED FIG. IC

n- TYPE Si DIFFUSED p TYPE Zn COMPENSATED

--- DISORDERED ACTIVE REGION

- - PROTON BOMBARDMENT

22 '7

N- TYPE SUBSTRATE

--_

FIG. 2

     XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 13 Number 6 November/December 1988

334

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 4

CURVED RESONATOR SEMICONDUCTOR LASER (Cont'd)

It is desirable for many appIications to eliminate the constraint and necessity of having two cleared mirrors as feedback when fabricating a laser cavity in a semiconductor laser device. This is particularly true where such laser devices are integrated into an electro-optic circuit on a semiconductor chip. Thus, monolithic integration of complex circuits with laser emitters is just one example of problems encountered in integration of electro-optic components on a chip. Another example is where a fixed cavity length is necessary for a particular on-chip laser application.

It has been previously proposed to accomplish various curved waveguide resonator structures employing ain and index guided lasers. Examples are illustrated in the article of J. H. 8 arran et al. in the IEEE Journal of Quantum

Electronics, Vol. QE6, p. 367 (1970) and USP 4,112,389. However, the radii of curvature required to make such laser structures functional is quite large because of the less than optimal waveguiding properties of gain guided lasers. Further, the constraints relative to selective etching to fabricate ring reflectors proposed by USP 4,112,389 also results in a large radius, which is not conducive for on-chip integration. Such real refractive index waveguide lasers are clearly more desirable. However, t...