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COST EFFECTIVE SHAFTING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025918D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The figure illustrates an alternative and cost effective design for sup orting is achieved by using a "C" cross-section configuration shaft made from sheet metal. The "C" cross-section provides a free "keyway" or longitudinal slot that can be used to circumferentially secure a tanged drive or driven member. For example, the figure illustrates a drive roll 10 having tang 12 inserted in slot 14 of "C" cross-section shaft 16. Subassembly involves ramming the constricted "C" shaft through a fixture-located drive member, bearings and driven memberts). Spring back of the shaft provides good concentricity of all components and axial retention of the driven members is accomplished by local lancing of the shaft to be performed as part of the subassemby operation. Such local lancing forms a dimple 18 which replaces shaft grooves and E-rings used in conventional shafting. This technique is very cost effective in reducing the number of parts and is also capable of being automated for assembly of shafts.

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Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COST EFFECTIVE SHAFTING Proposed Frank W. Lawson Classification

Int. C1. F16c 3/00


U.S. ci. 46~183

Volume 13 Number 6 November/December 1988 345

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COST EFFECTIVE SHAFTING (Cont'd)

The figure illustrates an alternative and cost effective design for sup orting

is achieved by using a "C" cross-section configuration shaft made from sheet metal. The "C" cross-section provides a free "keyway" or longitudinal slot that can be used to circumferentially secure a tanged drive or driven member. For example, the figure illustrates a drive roll 10 having tang 12 inserted in slot 14 of "C" cross-section shaft 16. Subassembly involves ramming the constricted "C" shaft through a fixture-located drive member, bearings and driven memberts). Spring back of the shaft provides good concentricity of all components and axial retention of the driven members is accomplished by local lancing of the shaft to be performed as part of the subassemby operation. Such local lancing forms a dimple 18 which replaces shaft grooves and E-rings used in conventional shafting. This technique is very cost effective in reducing the number of parts and is also capable of being automated for assembly of shafts.

and locating members such as pulleys, gears, rolls, sprockets on a sha P t. This

XEROX 3 46 DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

Volume 13 Number 6 November/December 1988

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