Browse Prior Art Database

ROOFSHOOTER FACE WIPKNG GROOVES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000025988D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Experimental observations of an operating roofshooter style bubble jet printhead indicate that the drop directionality is quite sensitive to excess fluid on the nozzle surface periphery. A prior art method of draining surface fluid from the printhead is the use of small holes in the aperture plate. These holes drain the surface fluid back into the printhead reservoir. However, a distinct disadvantage of these structures is that these holes are additional sites of ink evaporation, which can result in the well known first drop problem and can require exotic capping procedures.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ROOFSHOOTER FACE WIPKNG Proposed Classification GROOVES U.S. C1.427/38 Donald J. Drake Int. C1. B05d 3/06

18

18 18 1

18 14 14

14

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~~ aa

12

12

NG. I

Volume 14 Number 3 May/June 1989 167

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

ROOFSHOOTER FACE WIPING GROOVES (Cont'd)

20

14 14 74 14

'FE. 2

168 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

Volume 14 Number 3 May/June 1989

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 4

ROOFSHOOTER FACE WIPING GROOVES (Cont'd)

Experimental observations of an operating roofshooter style bubble jet printhead indicate that the drop directionality is quite sensitive to excess fluid on the nozzle surface periphery. A prior art method of draining surface fluid from the printhead is the use of small holes in the aperture plate. These holes drain the surface fluid back into the printhead reservoir. However, a distinct disadvantage of these structures is that these holes are additional sites of ink evaporation, which can result in the well known first drop problem and can require exotic capping procedures.

Referring to Figure 1, a schematic, isometric view of a nozzle plate 10 is shown having nozzles 12 and a series of grooves 14 in or on the nozzle plate surface 16.
The rooves drain any surface fluid from the nozzle late of the ink jet

have sufficiently small spacing to provide capillary action to remove fluid from the re 'on of the nozzles. In a low cost ink jet printer, the collection station could &: e merely a pie...