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APPLICATION DEFINED CONTROL PANEL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026001D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Copiers and other electrically controlled devices require a control panel as a means for the operator to designate how the machine should operate. If the machine has more than one configuration the control panel must be designed so as to be changeable or to contain all alternatives. These panel layouts must be determined early in the design making it difficult to incorporate late improvements or retrofits.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

APPLICATION DEFINED CONTROL Proposed Classification PANEL U.S. C1.355/14C Craig A. Smith
Int. Ruediger W. Knodt Cl. G03g 15/00

Copiers and other electrically controlled devices require a control panel as a means for the operator to designate how the machine should operate. If the machine has more than one configuration the control panel must be designed so as to be changeable or to contain all alternatives. These panel layouts must be determined early in the design making it difficult to incorporate late improvements or retrofits.

An application defined control panel leaves panel design mostly in the domain of the software. A direct or indirect touch panel covers the whole control surface. When this panel is touched a signal is sent to the panel or system software telling that a touch has been made and where it was made. The system software defines (for instance) how a feature works but the location of the controls is not defined. Each actuator function has associated with it (on software) a location on the panel. This is much like the touch screen on a CRT. But, instead of having this information preset.(the same on each machine) the locations would be entered into each machine. A bezel or label would be placed on the panel (or under it if it were transparent). The location of the button position would not matter. The logic would present a message (or series of messages) like, "where is copy lighter button". The tech rep, for example, wo...