Browse Prior Art Database

LASER READY DETECTOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026004D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 101K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

One of the significant service cost items in laser printers is the laser tube assembly. It is very difficult to fault isolate the laser from surrounding assemblies, namely the supporting electronics, modulator, raster output scanner optics, laser power supply and polygon assembly. If a detector is placed directly in conjunction with the laser tube, a specific fault code can identify the laser, power supply and harnessing as the area of failure, greatly reducing the steps in the fault isolation rocedure. Furthermore, if a laser

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

2

LASER READY DETECTOR

Proposed Janet R. Sterritt Classification

U.S. C1.372/109
Int. C1. HOls 3/00

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1

FIG. 2

Volume 14 Number 4 July/August 1989 201

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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LASER READY DETECTOR (Cont'd)

One of the significant service cost items in laser printers is the laser tube assembly. It is very difficult to fault isolate the laser from surrounding assemblies, namely the supporting electronics, modulator, raster output scanner optics, laser power supply and polygon assembly. If a detector is placed directly in conjunction with the laser tube, a specific fault code can identify the laser, power supply and harnessing as the area of failure, greatly reducing the steps in the fault isolation rocedure. Furthermore, if a laser

would be capable of defining an exact laser tube fault. The difficulty of this approach is in sensing that the laser tube is not operating, referred to as lazing.

With reference to Figures 1 and 2, the laser ready detector 6 consists of a red- sensitive (for Helium-Neon lasers) or blue sensitive (for Argon lasers) hotodiode 7 laced in a light transmitting medium 8 adjoining laser tube 9.

housing 10 and inserting the detector photodiode 7 as shown in detail in Figure
2. The detector 7, is affixed to the laser tube 9 with clear hot melt glue 11.

The laser ready detector 6 operates on two basic principles: (1) some light is emitted from the sides of the laser tube 9 when the laser tube is on, (2) the side emitted light is red when a He-Ne tube (or blue for Ar tube) is lazing. By placing the detecto...