Browse Prior Art Database

XEROPRINTING MASTER WITH IMPROVED CONTRAST POTENTIAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026006D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 121K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Xeroprinting processes generally entail creation of a printing master that is subsequently employed to generate a large number of prints by a xerographic process. Xeroprinting processes can employ migration imaging members, as disclosed in U.S. Patents 4,536,457 and 4,536,458, to form the xeroprinting master. The imaging member employed to create the printing master generally comprises a conductive layer and a layer of polymeric material capable of being softened u on treatment with heat, solvent, vapor, or the like.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

XEROPRINTING MASTER WITH Proposed Classification IMPROVED CONTRAST POTENTIAL U.S. C1.430/41 Robert W. Gundlach Int. C1. G03g 13/00

Xeroprinting processes generally entail creation of a printing master that is subsequently employed to generate a large number of prints by a xerographic process. Xeroprinting processes can employ migration imaging members, as disclosed in U.S. Patents 4,536,457 and 4,536,458, to form the xeroprinting master. The imaging member employed to create the printing master generally comprises a conductive layer and a layer of polymeric material capable of being softened u on treatment with heat, solvent, vapor, or the like.

with the conductive layer is a monolayer of particles of a photosensitive material, such as selenium, selenium alloys, or the like. Creation of the master entails uniformly charging the imaging member, exposing it to light in imagewise fashion, and subsequently causing the polymeric material to soften, thus enabling photosensitive particles in areas that had been ex osed to light

member that were not exposed to light (non-image areas), the monolayer of photosensitive particles remains intact and continues to function as a photoconductor. In areas of the imaging member that were exposed to light (image areas), the imaging member does not function as a photoconductor when exposed to li ht. Accordingly, when the imaging member is

areas discharge almost completely, while the image areas remain charged to about 50 percent of their original potential. These charged image areas can then be developed and transferred to paper, and the process of uniformly charging and light exposing the imaging member can be repeated, so that the imaging member now functions as a xeroprinting master.

The difference in potential between the imaged and non-imaged areas can be improved by incorporating into the softenable polymeric layer a light- attenuating material. The light-attenuating material reduces the photosensitivity of th...