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MECHANISM FOR AUTOMATED XEROPRINTING USING A MIGRATION IMAGING MEMBER MASTER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026007D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 4 page(s) / 184K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Xeroprinting processes generally entail creation of a printing master that is subsequently employed to generate a large number of prints by a xerographic process. Xeroprinting processes can employ migration imaging members, as disclosed in U.S. Patents 4,536,457 and 4,536,458, to form the xeroprinting master. The imaging member employed to create the printing master generally comprises a conductive layer and a layer of polymeric material capable of being softened upon treatment with heat, solvent, vapor, or the like. Situated on or near the surface of the softenable polymeric layer not in contact with the conductive layer is a monolayer of particles of a photosensitive material, such as selenium, selenium alloys, or the like. Creation of the master entails uniformly charging the imaging member, exposing it to light in imagewise fashion, and subsequently causing the polymeric material to soften, thus enabling photosensitive particles in areas that had been exposed to light to migrate through the softenable polymer material. In areas of the imaging member that were not exposed to light (non-image areas), the monolayer of photosensitive particles remains intact and continues to function as a photoconductor. In areas of the imaging member that were exposed to light (image areas), the imaging member does not function as a photoconductor when exposed to light. Accordingly, when the imaging member is subsequently charged and then uniformly exposed to light, the non-image areas discharge almost complete1 , while the image areas remain charged to

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MECHANISM FOR AUTOMATED Proposed Classification XEROPRINTING USING A MIGRATION
IMAGING MEMBER MASTER
Samuel W. Ing

U.S. C1.430/41 Int. C1. G03g 13/00

1 15 I 3

I 9

n.n t

23

Volume 14 Number 4 July/August 1989

21 13

207

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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MECHANISM FOR AUTOMATED XEROPRINTING USING A MIGRATION IMAGING MEMBER MASTER (Cont'd)

Xeroprinting processes generally entail creation of a printing master that is subsequently employed to generate a large number of prints by a xerographic process. Xeroprinting processes can employ migration imaging members, as disclosed in U.S. Patents 4,536,457 and 4,536,458, to form the xeroprinting master. The imaging member employed to create the printing master generally comprises a conductive layer and a layer of polymeric material capable of being softened upon treatment with heat, solvent, vapor, or the like. Situated on or near the surface of the softenable polymeric layer not in contact with the conductive layer is a monolayer of particles of a photosensitive material, such as selenium, selenium alloys, or the like. Creation of the master entails uniformly charging the imaging member, exposing it to light in imagewise fashion, and subsequently causing the polymeric material to soften, thus enabling photosensitive particles in areas that had been exposed to light to migrate through the softenable polymer material. In areas of the imaging member that were not exposed to light (non-image areas), the monolayer of photosensitive particles remains intact and continues to function as a photoconductor. In areas of the imaging member that were exposed to light (image areas), the imaging member does not function as a photoconductor when exposed to light. Accordingly, when the imaging member is subsequently charged and then uniformly exposed to light, the non-image areas discharge almost complete1 , while the image areas remain charged to

then be developed and transferred to paper, and the process of uniformly charging and light exposing the imaging member can be repeated, so that the imaging member now functions as a xeroprinting master.

P potential. These charged image areas can

An automated mechanism as shown in Figure 1 allows the master making step and the xerographic imaging step to be performed in a sequential fashion in the same machine without operator intervention. As illustrated, migration imaging member film 1 is wrapped around drum 3 and around takeup rollers 5 and 7 contained inside drum 3 in scroll configuration. During the master making step, the film 1 is charged at charging corotron 9 and imagewise exposed at imaging station 11, which can be a raster output scanner or an optical input system. During this step, toning station 13 is cammed away from the film 1. Subsequent to imagewise exposure, the film 1 is developed at development station 15 by exposure to radiant heat, solvent treatment, vapor treatment, or the like. Follow...