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LOW COST BAR CODE READER FOR COPY CARTRIDGES AND PHOTORECEPTORS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026021D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

One of the more common machine configurations, particularly for smaller and lower cost copiers and printers, involves the use of a replaceable copy cartridge which has a limited life and is removable from the main frame of the machine to be replaced by a similar cartrid e. Typically, these copy

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CEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LOW COST BAR CODE READER FOR COPY CARTRIDGES AND PHOTO- RECEPTORS Int. C1. G03G 15/00 Douglas P. Connolly

Proposed Classification

U.S. C1.355/3R

One of the more common machine configurations, particularly for smaller and lower cost copiers and printers, involves the use of a replaceable copy cartridge which has a limited life and is removable from the main frame of the machine to be replaced by a similar cartrid e. Typically, these copy

warranty that the copy cartridges and the photoreceptor will be effective for a stated number of copies. In addition, many photoreceptors in machines have limited lives and are also replaced. It is therefore imperative that an accurate record be kept for each cartridge or photoreceptor installed in the machine to identify and record in the machine memory the number of copies that have been made. One technique for doing this would be to place a bar code reader directly in the copying machine. However, that adds significant additional expense to the manufacturing cost of the machine. Alternatively, in those machine configurations wherein a photoreceptor belt is used either in the replaceable cartridge or on its own, a bar code could be placed on the photoreceptor using either multiple belt holes or interruptions in the opaque grounding strip coding. Typically, machines, base machine timing off of a belt hole through a belt hole sensor. If the belt is provided with multiple holes with a variety of spaces and/or sizes, the belt hole sensor can also identify classes of cartridges and/or specific photorece tors. By interrupting the

may be read by an optical sensor which the machine software can decode and record. The bar code signal should be different from the belt hole signal to avoid machine logic confusion over what the signal is. This may be accomplished by having a bar code signal of a shorter pulse duration than the belt hole signal. In this way, the number of cop...