Browse Prior Art Database

CALIBRATED MECHANICAL POSITIONING TECHNIQUE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026024D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In a copier, many types of motion control systems can be used for movement and positionin . These motion control systems usually consist of a driving and control circuitry that monitors the feedback and controls the driving element, usual K y a motor, a feedback element to indicate speed or position,

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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I :ROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CALIBRATED MECHANICAL Proposed Classification POSITIONING TECHNIQUE US. Cl. 355/14C

Int. Cl. G03g 21/00

Charles E. McPherson
Dennis J. Smith

I

Min Speed

Window( Timing Speed Nominal 4 I 5 At)

h v

Max. Speed

t0 ts te

Nominal Speed

time

FIG. I

Timing Window( k ht)

FIG. 2

In a copier, many types of motion control systems can be used for movement and positionin . These motion control systems usually consist of a driving

usual element, and control circuitry that monitors the feedback and controls the driving

K y a motor, a feedback element to indicate speed or position,

Volume 14 Number 5 Septernber/October 1989 247

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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CALIBRATED MECHANICAL POSITIONING TECHNIQUE (Cont'd)

element. Typically, these systems are designed for specific applications and individual components are selected to comply with the requirements of the implementation. Recent increased use of permanent magnet (PM) type DC motors has enabled the integration of the motor power supply into the machine, independent of the external power characteristics, thereby making PM motors multinational parts.

In order to meet the critical timing requirements of copier systems, a system timing diagram, similar to that shown in FIG. 1 is usually developed. The elements in FIG. 1 represent the events that occur during a typical motor control cycle. Initially, an event occurs at time tO to trigger an action that should be completed at time te. An example action might be the movement of a sheet of paper from one point to another. Typically, there is a timing window (+At) associated with this event, such that the action must be completed within the timing window in order to maintain the functionality of the system. As illustrated in FIG. 1, a motor with speeds approaching maximum or minimum specification levels would prove to be unsuitable for the application. This critical timing demand can result in narrow motor spe...