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Browse Prior Art Database

TONER PILE HEIGHT GAUGE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026030D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The amount of toner deposited on a surface is determined, for instance in order to measure the efficiency of a magnetic brush system used to deposit the toner. The gauge uses a flat piston urged by a spring towards a cylindrical or planar surface carrying the toner. The constant force applied by the spring ensures consistent results without operator error. The piston compresses the layer of toner in being stopped, and an associated micrometer determines the distance of the piston from a fiduciary position. Thereafter the toner is removed from the surface and the operation repeated, with the piston impacting the bare surface. All other things being equal, the difference between the two readings is the height of the compressed layer of toner. This enables meaningful comparisons to be made under different deposition conditions.

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Page 1 of 2

EROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

TONER PILE HEIGHT GAUGE
A.
Delhomme U.S. C1.355/200
J. V. S. Morgan

Proposed Classification

Int. Cl. G03g 15/00

Volume 14 Number 4 September/October 1989 261

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 2

TONER PILE HEIGHT GAUGE (Cont'd)

The amount of toner deposited on a surface is determined, for instance in order to measure the efficiency of a magnetic brush system used to deposit the toner.

The gauge uses a flat piston urged by a spring towards a cylindrical or planar surface carrying the toner. The constant force applied by the spring ensures consistent results without operator error. The piston compresses the layer of toner in being stopped, and an associated micrometer determines the distance of the piston from a fiduciary position. Thereafter the toner is removed from the surface and the operation repeated, with the piston impacting the bare surface. All other things being equal, the difference between the two readings is the height of the compressed layer of toner. This enables meaningful comparisons to be made under different deposition conditions.

The accompanying figure shows one form of gauge, with the four feet of the gauge body penetrating the toner layer so that the body position relative to the surface carrying the toner is unchanged during two successive operations of the gauge.

The operator lifts the piston against the spring bias, and releases it without adding any additional biasing force.

262

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