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PREVENTION OF INK WEEPING DUE TO POSITIVE PRESSURE SURGES IN AN INK JET INK SUPPLY SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026063D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 6 page(s) / 250K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A common design for an ink jet printing device is to have a multi-jet printhead scan back and forth across a page as it prints a line (or several lines) at a time. The printhead or paper is then advanced after each successive scan to continue printing from top to bottom on the page. Such a device must incorporate a means for providing the printhead with ink. This may be done in several ways.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PREVENTION OF INK WEEPING DUE TO POSITIVE PRESSURE US. C1.346/140R SURGES IN AN INK JET INK Int. C1. Gold 15/18 SUPPLY SYSTEM
Peter A. Torpey
Dale
R. Ims
Ivan Rezanka

Proposed Classification

FIG. I

16 J 26-

FIG. 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 JanuaryIFebruary 1990 11

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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PREVENTION OF INK WEEPING DUE TO POSITIVE PRESSURE SURGES IN AN INK JET INK SUPPLY SYSTEM(Cont'd)

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Pr = - 2.0"

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12 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 January/February 1990

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PREVENTION OF INK WEEPING DUE TO POSITIVE PRESSURE SURGES IN AN INK JET INK SUPPLY SYSTEM(Cont'd)

16 16

FIG. 5a

FIG. 56

36

FIG. 6

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 January/February 1990 13

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 4 of 6

PREVENTION OF INK WEEPING DUE TO POSITIVE PRESSURE SURGES IN AN INK JET INK SUPPLY SYSTEM(Cont'd)

A common design for an ink jet printing device is to have a multi-jet printhead scan back and forth across a page as it prints a line (or several lines) at a time. The printhead or paper is then advanced after each successive scan to continue printing from top to bottom on the page. Such a device must incorporate a means for providing the printhead with ink. This may be done in several ways.

One method for providing ink to the printhead is to connect a long, flexible tube or hose from a stationary ink reservoir to the moving printhead. In such a system, positive and negative pressure surges will invariably be generated in the supply line due to the acceleration of the printhead at the end of each scan as it changes directions. Although the meniscus within each nozzle can generally protect against large negative pressure surges, this is not the case for even moderate positive pressure surges. A positive pressure surge in the ink supply system may lead to ink weeping out of the printhead. Ink weeping can, in turn, lead to ink being deposited in undesired areas both on the paper and/or in the printing device.

Figure 1 shows a top view of the ink supply system 10 for a reciprocating carriage printer as described above. The main ink reservoir 12 is located at a lower elevation than the printhead 14 and is connected thereto by supply tube 16. The printhead is attached to a carriage (not shown) that translates back and forth across the paper 18, as depicted by arrows 20, a predetermined distance therefrom and in a plane parallel thereto. Note that accelerations of the printheadkupply line at the ends of travel result in pressure surges in the ink system. These surges result from the inertia of the ink in the tubes, sometimes called "water hammer" effect. The accelerations of the...