Browse Prior Art Database

USING A PIEZO DEVICE TO ELIMINATE TRANSIENT VIBRATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026066D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 6 page(s) / 255K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Figure 1 illustrates an x-y scanner 10 comprising a fast scanning carriage 12 which operates bidirectionally scanning across the paper 11 and is mounted to an indexing carriage 13 which indexes transversely down the paper between scans.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

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USING A PIEZO DEVICE TO Proposed Classification ELIMINATE TRANSIENT VIBRA- US. C1.350/006.1 TIONS Int. C1. G02b 26/08 Denis J. Stemmle

FIG. I

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 January/February 1990 25

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USING A PIEZO DEVICE TO ELIMINATE TRANSIENT VIBRATIONS( Cont'd)

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FIG. 3

26 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Voi. 15, No. 1 JanuaryIFebruary 1990

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USING A PIEZO DEVICE TO ELIMINATE TRANSIENT VIBRATIONS( Cont'd)

AMPLITUDE

for any -constant peak regardless peak to * Fig. 4

attenuation

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Cycle time = t =

of amplitude

Fig. 5

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 January/February 1990 27

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USING A PIEZO DEVICE TO ELIMINATE TRANSIENT VIBRATIONS( Cont'd)

Figure 1 illustrates an x-y scanner 10 comprising a fast scanning carriage 12 which operates bidirectionally scanning across the paper 11 and is mounted to an indexing carriage 13 which indexes transversely down the paper between scans.

Two types of drives have been proposed to achieve the required positioning accuracy for the index carriage, a single sided and double sided drive. The double sided drives have the advantage of insuring carriage parallelizm however they are much more expensive, have more parts, and require more assembly time than the single sided drive. While the single sided drive is inherently less expensive, it usually is designed such that it is mounted to and slides along a single precision ground shaft 28 as illustrated in Figures 2 and 3 to control the carriage position in two dimensions. The outboard end of the carriage slides along a rail to prevent rotation about the shaft just mentioned. As illustrated in the plan view of Figure 2 and the end view of Figure 3 the fast scanning carriage 12 is driven by belt 32 and motor 33 while the indexing carriage is positioned on shaft 28 by belt 30 and motor 31.

Figures 2 and 3 illustrate mounting a piezo device with an appropriate amplifier on the outboard end of the index carriage, vibrating the piezo at a frequency above the audible range (say 30 to 40Khz) in order to reduce the friction drag to near zero during index and while the transients are dying out after the index motion is complete. This will have the effect of reducing the carriage deformations due to friction drag as well as limiting the residual flexural stresses in the carriage and shaft. But once the index motion is complete, the piezo device is turned off, thus restoring the initially high friction drag force on the outboard end of the carriage.

A concern with the single sided drive indexing with almost no outboard friction drag load is the time for transient vibrations to dampen out after the index is complete. If the fast scan carriage begins to move while the indexing carriage is still ringing, these transient errors...