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REDUNDANT RASTERING FOR DECREASED VIBRATION SENSI TIVITY IN DIGITAL PRINTERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026067D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The sensitivity of xerographic digital printers to non-uniform motion or vibration of the photoreceptor can be reduced by increasing the raster frequency in the process (but not the fast scan) direction while keeping informational content the same by printing the added lines with the same (redundant) image information. Thus, an image can be digitized at a lower frequency that is more sensitive to vibrations, say 300 spi, and print it at a higher, less sensitive raster frequency such as 600, 900 or 1200 spi in the process direction. In the fast scan (perpendicular to process) direction the spot size and addressability would remain at 300 spi. This type of image structure is most easily achieved by printing redundant information with a spot that is narrow in the process direction. That is, to print the 300 spi image at 1200 spi, 4 raster lines of the same information would be printed with the raster spacing and the process direction spot size equal to 1/1200 spi = 21 microns.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

REDUNDANT RASTERING FOR Proposed Classification DECREASED VIBRATION SENSI- U.S. C1.350/6.8 TIVITY IN DIGITAL PRINTERS
Robert P. Loce
Robert H. Melino
William L. Lama

Int. Cl. G02b 26/08

The sensitivity of xerographic digital printers to non-uniform motion or vibration of the photoreceptor can be reduced by increasing the raster frequency in the process (but not the fast scan) direction while keeping informational content the same by printing the added lines with the same (redundant) image information. Thus, an image can be digitized at a lower frequency that is more sensitive to vibrations, say 300 spi, and print it at a higher, less sensitive raster frequency such as 600, 900 or 1200 spi in the process direction. In the fast scan (perpendicular to process) direction the spot size and addressability would remain at 300 spi. This type of image structure is most easily achieved by printing redundant information with a spot that is narrow in the process direction. That is, to print the 300 spi image at 1200 spi, 4 raster lines of the same information would be printed with the raster spacing and the process direction spot size equal to 1/1200 spi = 21 microns.

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 January/February 1990 31

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32 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 1 January/February 1990

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]