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FRICTION REDUCTION TECHNIQUE FOR FLEXIBLE BELT PHOTORECEPTORS MEMBER CONTACTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026091D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Electrophotographic copiers, duplicators and printers which use flexible belt type photoreceptors often contain rollers or stationary metallic members in intimate contact with the back of the belt for guiding and rotating the belt. The stationary metallic members are used, for example, as (a) back-up plates for charging, cleaning, exposure, (b) reverse bends for development, and (c) as a passive part of the belt drive system. The major problems with these stationary members are (i) that they wear the back surface of the belt causing debris in the form of fine particles which migrate through the machine leading to other sub-system failures and copy quality defects, and (ii) that they can increase the opacity of the belt thereby causing losses in erase or other back-surface illumination energy reaching the photoconductive layer.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

I

FRICTION REDUCTION TECH- NIQUE FOR FLEXIBLE BELT PHOTORECEPTORS MEMBER CONTACTS

I Brian E. Springett

Proposed Classification

U.S. C1.355/212 Int. C1. G03g 5/00

Electrophotographic copiers, duplicators and printers which use flexible belt type photoreceptors often contain rollers or stationary metallic members in intimate contact with the back of the belt for guiding and rotating the belt. The stationary metallic members are used, for example, as (a) back-up plates for charging, cleaning, exposure, (b) reverse bends for development, and (c) as a passive part of the belt drive system. The major problems with these stationary members are (i) that they wear the back surface of the belt causing debris in the form of fine particles which migrate through the machine leading to other sub-system failures and copy quality defects, and (ii) that they can increase the opacity of the belt thereby causing losses in erase or other back- surface illumination energy reaching the photoconductive layer.

A solution to the foregoing problems involves acoustically exciting the members in question. This is readily accomplished by inexpensive acoustic transducers such as BaTi03, LiNb03 or similar piezo-electric materials bonded to the members and excited at frequencies such as to produce acoustic oscillations (at or near resonant frequencies for most efficient acoustic energy coupling).

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