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TYPING ANTICIPATOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026101D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 4 page(s) / 159K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Many people who operate keyboards have minimal typing skills. It would assist these people if the number of keystrokes required were reduced. The number of keystrokes can be reduced by anticipating and displaying the probable completion of a word each time a character of the word is typed. The typist could then select between accepting the displayed completion, jumping to the end of the displayed completion to add or modify a suffix, backspacing to delete the most recently typed character, or typing another keystroke.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

End of Word

TYPING ANTICIPATOR

A. Lawrence Spitz

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1.364/900 Int. C1. G06f 1/00

10 Character

' Char

c

 Backup on
Current Buffer

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 2 March/April 1990 101

 Retrieve Keystroke

I Char I Word

Delimiter

Output Buffer

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

TYPING ANTICIPATOR(Cont'd)

Many people who operate keyboards have minimal typing skills. It would assist these people if the number of keystrokes required were reduced.

The number of keystrokes can be reduced by anticipating and displaying the probable completion of a word each time a character of the word is typed. The typist could then select between accepting the displayed completion, jumping to the end of the displayed completion to add or modify a suffix, backspacing to delete the most recently typed character, or typing another keystroke.

The figure illustrates steps in this technique. In box 10, the system performing the technique receives an initial character of a word, which will be the first character after a word delimiter. In box 12, the system stores the character in a current word buffer, in which it will be held pending further keystrokes. In box 14, the system automatically guesses and displays a completion of the word, including the character received in box 10, without receiving any further keystrokes requesting a guess; the guess can be based on a dictionary lookup, modified according to word frequency, recent occurrence of a word, appropriate part of speech, or length, such as by guessing the longest completion first in order to maximize the number of keystrokes saved. The step in box 16 then receives another keystroke, and the system then branches based on the keystroke received.

If the keystroke received in box 16 is another character, the system simply returns to box 12 to store it in the buffer. Then the system guesses and displays another completion of the word in box 14, taking into account the additional character.

If the keystroke in box 16 is a word delimiter such as a punctuation mark, a space, a tab, or a carriage return, the step in box 20 loads the word from the current word buffer into the output buffer, followed by the word delimiter. From the output buffer the word may be printed, displayed, or otherwise provided as output as appropriate. Then, in box 22, the system receives another keystroke, which will ordinarily be either another word delimiter or the initial character of a new word. If a word delimiter, the system sends it to the output buffer in box 24, but if a character, the system returns to the step in box 12.

If the...