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BINARY RESISTOR NETWORK METHOD OF DENSITY MODULATION FOR IONOGRAPHIC PRINTING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026113D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 4 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In ionographic printing devices, wherein a latent image is formed by imagewise modulation of a stream of ions directed towards a charge retentive surface, the final image density can be controlled by varying the amount of charge deposited in the creation of the latent image. In principle, the use of N data bits to describe each pixel in the image would allow printing 2N distinct grey levels. For example, in a 2 bit per pixel system, each pixel could be one of four levels.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

BINARY RESISTOR NETWORK Proposed Classification METHOD OF DENSITY US. C1.346/158 MODULATION FOR IONOGRAPHIC
PRINTING
Frank C. Genovese

Int. C1. Gold 15/06

64 DRIVERS v1

V V

I I

--

Fig. 7A I - Storage Capacitor -

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 3 May/June 1990 137

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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BINARY RESISTOR NETWORK METHOD OF DENSITY MODULATION FOR IONOGRAPHIC PRINTING(Cont'd)

n

I I

Fig. 2

0

I

138 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 3 May/June 1990

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 4

BINARY RESISTOR NETWORK METHOD OF DENSITY MODULATION FOR IONOGRAPHIC PRINTING(Cont'd)

In ionographic printing devices, wherein a latent image is formed by imagewise modulation of a stream of ions directed towards a charge retentive surface, the final image density can be controlled by varying the amount of charge deposited in the creation of the latent image. In principle, the use of N data bits to describe each pixel in the image would allow printing 2N distinct grey levels. For example, in a 2 bit per pixel system, each pixel could be one of four levels.

In accordance with Figure 1, an analog distribution network is shown in which the two bitlpixel system controls the distribution of four analog voltages to the control or modulation nibs, so that each nib voltage is nominally equal to one of the four analog voltages at the input to the distribution network. As noted in Figure...