Browse Prior Art Database

FAST SCAN WITH CONTINUOUS VELOCITY SLOW SCAN CARRIAGE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026144D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

At the present state of the technology, it is more cost effective to use writing heads of less than full page width for Thermal Ink Jet (TIJ) printing. This, in turn, necessitates the butting of adjacent scan lines. The tolerance for the relative location of the butted scan lines is very critical in order to avoid objectionable defects. Past architectures have used the paper motion (or carriage rail assembly) motion to accomplish this precision "stitching". This stitching procedure compromises both print speed and cost.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FAST SCAN WITH CONTINUOUS VELOCITY SLOW SCAN CARRIAGE Steven J. Diet1
Michael Carlotta
Paul J. Rowe
Frederick A. Donahue

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1.346/140R Int. C1. Gold 15/16

14

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 4 July/August 1990 211

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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FAST SCAN WITH CONTINUOUS VELOCITY SLOW SCAN CARRIAGE( Cont'd)

At the present state of the technology, it is more cost effective to use writing heads of less than full page width for Thermal Ink Jet (TIJ) printing. This, in turn, necessitates the butting of adjacent scan lines. The tolerance for the relative location of the butted scan lines is very critical in order to avoid objectionable defects. Past architectures have used the paper motion (or carriage rail assembly) motion to accomplish this precision "stitching". This stitching procedure compromises both print speed and cost.

In the method disclosed in the accompanying Figure, the paper 12 is adhered to a cylindrical drum 14 (mechanically, with electrostatics, vacuum, etc.) and rotated by motor 20 through clutch 22 with direct drive to the motor and drive pulleys 24,26 and connecting belt 28 as the fast scan. If the paper or the image is skewed, then the slow scan can translate continuously as opposed to stepping and thus act as a "barber pole" stripe. To further enhance this system 10, the slow scan translation of TIJ printhead 30 can be accomplished by a self return lead...