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XENON LAMP TRIGGER START AID

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026157D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A Xenon lamp exposure system is used within a reprographic system as a flash illumination source. Such a lamp was used to reduce the overall cost of the flash illumination system. However, the high trigger voltage for the lamp used, approximately 8000 volts, resulted in noise problems in the light sensing circuitry, as well as increased failure of the high voltage triggering circuitry. Reduction of the trigger potential, to alleviate these problems, caused an increase in the number of mis-flashes for the system. A neon glow lamp was placed beside the Xenon lamp in order to keep the rare gas ions within the Xenon lamp in an excited state, and thereby reduce the required trigger potential. Unfortunately, the glow lamp was only moderately successful in reducing the trigger potential to a satisfactory level, and also resulted in a more expensive illumination system.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

XENON LAMP TRIGGER START AID U.S. C1.355/229 Timothy A. Cole
Leo R. Farnand

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03g 15/04

10

20 -

\

FIG. I

FIG. 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 4 July/August 1990 247

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XENON LAMP TRIGGER START AID(Cont'd)

A Xenon lamp exposure system is used within a reprographic system as a flash illumination source. Such a lamp was used to reduce the overall cost of the flash illumination system. However, the high trigger voltage for the lamp used, approximately 8000 volts, resulted in noise problems in the light sensing circuitry, as well as increased failure of the high voltage triggering circuitry. Reduction of the trigger potential, to alleviate these problems, caused an increase in the number of mis-flashes for the system. A neon glow lamp was placed beside the Xenon lamp in order to keep the rare gas ions within the Xenon lamp in an excited state, and thereby reduce the required trigger potential. Unfortunately, the glow lamp was only moderately successful in reducing the trigger potential to a satisfactory level, and also resulted in a more expensive illumination system.

As illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, the electrodes, 12 and 14 of lamp 10, are maintained at a fixed distance from each other while enclosed in a glass vessel 16 filled with a rare or noble gas such as Xenon. Xenon lamp 10, is triggered, and caused to light, by the buildup of...