Browse Prior Art Database

DUAL RATE LEAF SPRING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026165D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In a xerographic reproduction machine, the descent of a stacking tray is controlled by a leaf spring which has a larger spring constant when the tray is more heavily loaded. The arrangement prevents the drop height for incoming documents (i.e., the distance through which incoming documents fall onto the top of the stack) from increasing to an unacceptable extent when the tray is carrying large heavyweight documents. If the drop height is not controlled, incoming documents have an increasing tendency to scatter the stack as the drop height increases.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

DUAL RATE LEAF SPRING

Classification Proposed P. J. Troup U.S. C1.355/321

Int. C1. G03g 21/00

2

FIG. 1

P

4 2 3 4

I

1

-

4

6 FIG. 2A I

FIG. 26

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 15, No. 4 July/August 1990 269

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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DUAL RATE LEAF SPRING(Cont'd)

In a xerographic reproduction machine, the descent of a stacking tray is controlled by a leaf spring which has a larger spring constant when the tray is more heavily loaded. The arrangement prevents the drop height for incoming documents (i.e., the distance through which incoming documents fall onto the top of the stack) from increasing to an unacceptable extent when the tray is carrying large heavyweight documents. If the drop height is not controlled, incoming documents have an increasing tendency to scatter the stack as the drop height increases.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of the leaf spring and Figures 2A to 2C are end views of the spring in association with a stacking tray carrying no load (Figure 2A), a light load (Figure 2B) and a heavier load (Figure 2C).

As shown in figure 1, the spring 1 comprises three parallel spring leaves 2, 3,

and 4 united at one end 5. In use, the spring is so arranged that when the stacking tray 6 is lightly loaded (Figure 2B), all three leaves 2 to 4 of the spring are employed with a corresponding increase in the spring constant and a decrease in the rate at which the tray descends under...