Browse Prior Art Database

SAMPLE PRINT PRODUCTION WITH ORDERED COPY SHEET STOCK

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026198D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Reprographic systems commonly include a feature allowing an operator to produce a sample print or copy sheet for a particular page of the output job. In an electronic reprographic system such a feature is generally implemented by producing the sample print on the next available copy stock sheet. Unfortunately, when the job currently being output is printed on ordered stock, for example tab stock, printing on the next available copy sheet would result in the use of an ordered stock sheet, thereby altering the order of the stock for subsequent printed output. It is possible, however, to recover from such a situation by simply purging the ordered stock tray, an option that is not only wasteful but also time consuming.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SAMPLE PRINT PRODUCTION Proposed Classification WITH ORDERED COPY SHEET
STOCK Int. C1. G03g 21/00 Michael E. Farrell
Robert W. Hurtz
Kris D. Kirchner

U.S. C1.355/309

Reprographic systems commonly include a feature allowing an operator to produce a sample print or copy sheet for a particular page of the output job. In an electronic reprographic system such a feature is generally implemented by producing the sample print on the next available copy stock sheet. Unfortunately, when the job currently being output is printed on ordered stock, for example tab stock, printing on the next available copy sheet would result in the use of an ordered stock sheet, thereby altering the order of the stock for subsequent printed output. It is possible, however, to recover from such a situation by simply purging the ordered stock tray, an option that is not only wasteful but also time consuming.

Accordingly, in an electronic reprographic system, several alternative solutions are a-ilable when an operator desires a sample print while the system is printiq on ordered copy stock. One possible solution would be to reject or ignore the request of the operator, thereby avoiding any disruption to the ordered stock. A second solution would be to have the system defer the sample print request until the system is no longer printing on ordered copy stock. Both of these potential solutions would avoid any unnecessary disruption to the printing on ordered copy stock an...