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PRECESSION INPUT SCANNING FOR ELECTRONIC COPYING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026281D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In the design of a light lens copier, the use of precession allows the process speed to be minimized for a given throughput. In terms of the photoreceptor conditions, precession allows the interdocument gap (and the process speed) to be minimized and therefore, permit the least amount of photoreceptor to be used for each copy. Typically in an electronic copier, the document is scanned at a synchronous rate to the process speed in order to eliminate the storage of the image in memory. This is an acceptable solution at lower throughput, but as the required throughput increases, this solution drives the process speeds very high. The effects of this higher speed have negative effects on the xerographic engine and the imaging system.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PRECESSION INPUT SCANNING Proposed Classification FOR ELECTRONIC COPYING U.S. C1.355/233 Daniel W. Costanza
Richard F. Lehman
John A. Durbin

Int. C1. G03g 15/28

In the design of a light lens copier, the use of precession allows the process speed to be minimized for a given throughput. In terms of the photoreceptor conditions, precession allows the interdocument gap (and the process speed) to be minimized and therefore, permit the least amount of photoreceptor to be used for each copy. Typically in an electronic copier, the document is scanned at a synchronous rate to the process speed in order to eliminate the storage of the image in memory. This is an acceptable solution at lower throughput, but as the required throughput increases, this solution drives the process speeds very high. The effects of this higher speed have negative effects on the xerographic engine and the imaging system.

This proposal represents a compromise between the storage of an entire image and the problems of increased speed by allowing the scanner to scan at a higher rate while the process speed remains at a lower rate to make efficient use of the photoreceptor. It is required that the data coming from the scanner be acquired at a faster rate than what the Raster Output Scanner (ROS) is printing; therefore, the excess data that accumulates during one scan must be stored in memory. However, the size of the memory required to store the access data is only a fraction...