Browse Prior Art Database

MICR IMAGE DURABILITY TREATMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026354D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A process for improving the durability of magnetic ink characters recognition (MICR) printed images is disclosed. A durability problem is frequently encountered with MICR toned images because of mechanical stress and shear forces experienced during normal processing in high speed readers and sorters. The MICR images may be optically degraded and magnetic readability may be reduced. Another durability problem associated with MICR images is that certain MICR toner formulations may offset from a printed page to vinyl surfaces, for example, as found in many plastic covered notebooks and checkbooks. The durability problems may be solved by selectively applying a thin non-magnetic film coating over the MICR image in a secondary fusing operation.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MICR IMAGE DURABILITY TREATMENT
Paul W. Eakin
Wayne R. Smith
Gerald Abowitz
Raphael F. Bov Jr.

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 430/138 Int. C1. G03g 09/16

A process for improving the durability of magnetic ink characters recognition (MICR) printed images is disclosed. A durability problem is frequently encountered with MICR toned images because of mechanical stress and shear forces experienced during normal processing in high speed readers and sorters. The MICR images may be optically degraded and magnetic readability may be reduced. Another durability problem associated with MICR images is that certain MICR toner formulations may offset from a printed page to vinyl surfaces, for example, as found in many plastic covered notebooks and checkbooks. The durability problems may be solved by selectively applying a thin non-magnetic film coating over the MICR image in a secondary fusing operation.

Advantages of the secondary coating/fusing process include: the protective film may be selectively applied only to the MICR toned image area and not the background or non-MICR images as desired; the film may be colorless, transparent with color tint, or opaque with color tint; greater vinyl offset resistance; and the coating process may be incorporated as a subsystem into existing MICR printers or may be combined as a stand alone finishing operation. A related MICR coating system and process is disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,891,240.

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOU...